Do you wanna dance, and hold my hand? Problems and issues facing ordinary Fijians

Including new travel tips!!!!

Yesterday, I got an email from a producer of a BBC Television show asking for some comments as she is looking at making a show about crazy places to drive a taxi.  In doing a response for her, I have included information that gives a picture (through my eyes as an Australian married to a Fijian, living here in Fiji) of what life in Fiji is like – really like!  So, if you wanna dance, and hold my hand and take a trip through Fijian life as I observe it, read on.  I have not mentioned the upcoming election in 2014, or any political views, but I can tell you that living in Fiji to me feels safe, secure.  Like the current government or not, most Fijians I speak to feel that at least the current Prime Minister is a man who gets around to local communities and gets things done.  Anyway, no more on politics.  My response to the enquiries below:

Thanks so much for your email.  I know heaps of taxi drivers as apart from the bus, it is my only mode of transport.  As far as I am aware, there are no “water taxis” as such.  When people need to travel over water, apart from the big barges and ferries operated by Patterson Brothers Shipping, Bligh Shipping and Groundar, they travel mostly by fibreglass boat such as in this story.  Often the boats are bought using microfinance or loans for thousands, and the fare is about $5, so I don’t know how they actually pay off the loans. http://www.fijisun.com.fj/2013/05/03/a-boat-for-yanuca-islanders/

For a list of shipping contacts see here: http://myfijiguide.com/general-info/boatsmarineshipping/shipping-companies-and-agents.aspx

Even from one point to another on the same island, it is easier and faster to get the boat.

Many people die each year in the small “fibres” as they are called.  http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=238916 including the late Tui (chief) Macuata.  There is a post in my blog about it.

Even government travel is by these small boats sometimes, such as teaching staff going between the islands.  http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=235708

If you wanted to put your man on the water, I would suggest that you do it in the Lomaiviti Group, that is the group of islands including Ovalau(where Levuka is, the old capital), Gau, Kadauv etc .  Actually here is a list of the islands.

There is plenty of boat travel between all of the islands in the group.  Including sea-road travel. for example, a truck wanting to take goods to Koro Island from Suva would have to travel by road to Natovi Landing near Nausori (Rewa Delta), then the truck goes on the boat to the island, then travels overland to destination.

Re normal taxi drivers, the cars are often old, the fare is usually about $3 for short trips, and they have to go on all kinds of roads.  Some travel regularly on the road from Suva to Nadi for $100 FJD.  The scary way to travel is by minibus.  There are minibus routes all over Fiji and the drivers drive non stop in all conditions, with vans jam packed full.

IMGP6677Later that night, further into the conversation, on being thanked for my prompt response (excuse my generalisation, not all Fijians drink Kava, and not all the time, but it is as expected at work here as late night Karaoke and drinking are in Japan.  If the boss says drink, you drink.  If you don’t you are seen as not loyal.  Also, due to the nature of family and clan ties, often there is a traditional relationship involved and to not drink would be considered socially unacceptable, disrespectful and frankly UnFijian:

Ahh, see I am married to a Fijian.  They all drink Kava, all the time.  It is midnight here and I am waiting for him to get home from the “meeting”.  By the way, I also should have mentioned that all the taxi drivers drink kava all the time also, even between jobs, or while waiting at their taxi base.  Especially if they have to go on a long job and take someone to the interior, they will be given Kava when they arrive.  It is not just a quick “one for the road” affair either! 

I do know someone here in Rewa who would be a great person.  His name is Jerry, and he is Fijian and owns traditional land, and drives the other kind of taxi which is a huge truck converted into a carrier with bench seats.  He does daily runs from Nausori to Logani and the other villages towards Bau Landing, which has probably some of the worst roads in Fiji.  Drivers here are very skillful, and he and his family are real characters.  His son is a great friend of mine.  They will take your man in like he is one of the family, and after work he will get to tend to cattle, plant dalo and ride horses in the sea.

IMG_2155

Our sleeping arrangements on the inter island ferry

IMGP2774

Just one small part of our family

Earlier today:

Hi, I am going to try and answer your questions below, I hope this helps you:

Oh by the way… Even if these boats you mention below are not ‘water taxis’ as such – do locals pay a fare? I love the suggestion about the trucks. As a local what do you think are the main ‘current affairs’ affecting Fijians and people like Jerry?

Yes, the locals pay a fare.  They also often pay with their lives.  A fibreglass is an open small boat as pictured in  https://alicevstokes.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/suva-harbour/.  They take officially 7 to 9 passengers across the reef, or if travelling from island to island, over open water.  The weather here is very changeable and the sea often treacherous.  Very few wear life jackets.  The inter-island fare is normally the cost of a weeks’ earnings for some people.  For example, from Levuka on Ovalau to Gau island, the fare is about $70.  Many Fijians earn $10/day.  However, if you “gotta go” then there is little option.  Because of strong traditional relationships, if there is a family event such as funeral etc, then you must travel.  Fijians (even Indo-Fijians) are very much tied to 3 places in this order: their mother’s village, their father’s village, their birth place.  Where they actually live or “stay” as they call it (for example if they have moved to Suva for work) is of little or no consequence.  I think that is one of the reasons there is so much litter here.  It is not your concern as it is not your village. 

For all Fijians that I know and have met, the family and family ties are the most important thing.  That is one of the most wonderful things about living in Fiji.  No matter the problems, family time (even with husband and wife, kids etc) is the number one priority.  Respect for your parents, and elders is paramount.  For example, my niece just had a baby.  Instead of being called the baby’s aunt, I am called the . grandmother or “Bubu” as I am in that generation (even though of course I am still wildly attractive and only 48) and all of my counterparts are considered as important to the baby, and a source of advice for the new mother.  The baby is named after its great grandfather (my husband’s father), my son – no blood relation, and the biological grandmother’s late father.  This is a huge honour to have a “yaca” (yatha).  Even as I write this, I feel an obligation to further explain the family relationships, as it matters so much (for example, that the baby’s mother is the first daughter of my husband’s eldest brother, and that the father of that eldest brother is the first namesake), but I won’t…. but you get the idea. 

The reason I am going into all this, is that for any taxi driver, boat driver, carrier driver, bus driver or whatever, family is the real driver.

Religion is the second driver.  God is real here, and your parents are viewed as God’s representative on earth. 

Even though wages and fares are low, the sense of community here is very strong.  If you ring a driver or get a driver and explain that you don’t have any money but your need to travel to a place for reasons of family, getting home or a commitment that is important (again, only family or religion), then they will take you on a promise.  Often I get home having not paid anything at all, not because I don’t have any money, just because one of my neighbours (anyone living within a 5km radius) or relatives (anyone from Gau or the Lomaiviti group, or Vanua Levu) has seen me and picked me up.

Taxi drivers here are the people you go to if you want or need to find anything.  They take a real sense of responsibility for making sure you get what you need.  They will go  into the shop with you and explain what you need, and negotiate.  They are friends with every one.  They are a very trusted group in the community and often have regular customers and jobs.  When I say customers, actually your taxi driver becomes part of the family.  They pick your kids up and take them to school, they tell people where you live, they help you move house, they make enquiries if you are searching for a house to rent or a car to buy.  They do everything for you.  I published some taxi driver phone numbers on my blog as these people I really trust.  They invite you to their daughters’ weddings, they are a blessing.

·         Who are Jerry’s (Or someone like him) customers – how reliant are people on taxis?

Jerry and the other drivers rely on their regular customers as much as their customers rely on them.  They do deliveries, make sure that all the kids are picked up, run rain, flood, hail or shine, as it is the only way for people to get home.  I came to Fiji in December the day after a cyclone and our road was flooded. Our driver somehow found a way through the flooded back roads, and got us home from the airport.  They will not leave their neighbours stranded. 

·         What is life like for a taxi driver – do they own a decent wage – how are they viewed by society in Fiji?

Many do not earn what we by Western standards would call a decent wage, but that is not important here.  Most people grow at least a decent proportion of their own food (except possibly in Suva City).  See above re society views. 

·         You say the roads are bad   – what are they like? Is there a bad accident rate?

The roads are appalling!  I can’t say much more.  It is really a “see to believe” type of thing.  The accident rate is also appalling.  Buses catch on fire regularly http://www.fijisun.com.fj/2013/07/05/another-bus-burned/ , minibuses crash regularly http://www.fijisun.com.fj/2009/09/16/bus-passengers-escape-death/

 and buses crash .  It is not so much the death rate, but that the accidents are always so shocking.  The shock coming from the cause, and also that we know that when someone dies or is seriously injured here, the financial toll on the family will force them into poverty.  (around 40% of Fijians live in what we call poverty, many in “informal settlements”. 

·         What are the main ‘social’ issues that are worth exploring in Fiji?

Poverty in housing – see “informal settlements” which we would call slums or shanty towns, or squatter settlements http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=227553

http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=238556 with an estimated 300,000 people in Fiji living in squatter settlements (total population just over 900,000 in Fiji) this is a pressing issue for so many.

tamavua i waiSquatter settlement at Tamavua i wai (near Suva).  Source: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=238556

Another source says that it is only 100,000 in squatter settlements, but I would go with the 300,000 having lived here.  http://news.ccf.org.fj/students-teachers-viewing-the-documentary-struggling-for-a-better-living-squatters-in-fiji/ also notes importantly that “Besides having no proper legal title to their homes, the vast majority of these people lack basic amenities such as piped water, sewerage and electricity”.

Poverty in education (school fees for one child are about $280 per year, but this is a struggle for many families, and children are disallowed from school regularly if their fees are overdue). It is a daily story in both major newspapers at the start of each school year.  http://www.fijisun.com.fj/2013/01/23/children-turned-away-for-not-paying-fees/

A better life for their children (just like all parents).  This involves spending a large proportion of the family income on education, and the hope of immigrating to the developed world.

·         What is Jerry and his family like – when you say ‘characters’ what would we find    compelling about them?

They are an amazing family.  Fijians often live in extended family groups.  Jerry and his family live in a village in Tailevu, and live on land owned under traditional title, that is passed through clans in traditional ways too long to go into here.  Jerry is head of the family.  The family is originally from Bau Island which means that they are highly regarded as Bau was the old seat of power in Fiji.  Also, too long an explanation re their compelling nature.  You will find most Fijian families compelling I think, but as Jerry and his family both operate a business and travel to and from town for work and schooling via boat, bus, carrier, taxi, minibus, and live a rural traditional lifestyle by the ocean, they are a good example of the best of Fiji.  Jerry’s son Eddie is 21, and a real thinker.  He knows everything there is to know about pig farming and takes responsibility for the schooling and school fees of his younger siblings.  He is a very attractive person both inside and out and a dear friend.

·         How real is the risk of flooding in the Delta – does this affect the roads? What season is worse for this?  http://www.pacificdisaster.net/pdnadmin/data/original/FJI_2012_FL_NEOC_Sitrep14.pdf

Gives a true picture of what happens to roads and transport in Fiji during the yearly (sometimes 3 times a year) floods.  Road closures, bus services suspended, bridges washed out.  But still the taxi drivers and carrier drivers manage to get people around.  That is when boat travel comes into its own.  You take a fibre from one point to another and bypass the flooded roads.  Flood season from December to April.  Floods here are devastating due to the quality of housing. Most houses made from corrugated iron roughly put together.  To get a picture of what it is like see http://poleshift.ning.com/profiles/blogs/7-of-10-sinking-fiji-this-current-flood-is-worse-than-the-floods

Some awesome pictures of the Nadi flooding that has many people calling for the whole town to be relocated. https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.365058533519909.106465.112621892096909&type=3

Children brave river dangerous river crossing to catch a ride to school since damage to crossing 7 months ago in Cyclone Evan http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=238801

·         Even though there aren’t ‘water taxis’ as such do the boats that people take out loans for carry other passengers.

fibre fdb

Source: Fiji Times Online

Yes, they get loans from FDB (Fiji Development Bank).  This is a real life story and a typical one: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=190741

It’s been such fun reading about life in Fiji from you mails – from Kava to riding horses in the sea – I feel like I have almost transported myself there from London for the day!

Fiji Roads Corporate Plan 2013 – see 1.3.3 and tables.  You will get an idea from the “horses mouth” about road conditions, and also the number of unsealed roads (where the term “road” is used loosely). http://www.fijiroads.org/sites/default/files/fra-corporate-plan-2013-final.pdf

“Irish Crossings”  http://www.fijisun.com.fj/2012/01/27/students-cross-flooded-creek/

are regularly washed out, bridges closed etc.  I can’t find a good example online as most of the info on Fiji is really quite lame, but Air Pacific (now Fiji Airways) has a great map in it’s inflight magazine showing the sealed and unsealed roads on each island.  Maybe you can pick one up from the local travel agent.  That will really give you a good picture.  Unsealed roads literally are little more than dirt tracks. I live on one, and it is very close to Suva.  Anyway, if you hit the google map http://goo.gl/maps/EmR99 and zoom in, you might get a bit more of an idea.  Drivers here are very skilful.  Many of the roads on the islands literally brush the ocean, with cliffs on one side, water on the other, and mud in between.  The road to Levuka from the ferry stop is harrowing, especially in the dark, and if it is raining.  If two vehicles meet, one has to back up.  Often that is a big, full bus or truck.  If one car or bus breaks down, then everyone waits.  That of course is a great opportunity for any taxi or carrier driver on the “lee” side of the breakdown as they come somehow, as if by magic, and ferry people from the traffic jam to the boats.

Advertisements

The state of Education in Fiji – what are we teaching them – are we drowing?

Our son, Dominic is in Form 3 (grade 9).  The school he currently attends is a very expensive school by Fijian standards, Suva Christian Community High School.  It is a beautiful school housed in an old church building.  The school has just built a new science lab, the facilities are clean, and the education is unique.  It is a small school with less than 100 students from form 3 to form 7.  Because of the size of the school, they do not offer any inter-school sports, as there are no teachers to coach teams, and to field a team in any age group would be difficult given the numbers.  They also do not participate in swimming as an organised activity.  At the primary school they do, but at the High School, they don’t.  Kids can compete in the inter school swimming, but only if they are members of an outside school club.  This is a bit sad, as the High School is at Laucala Beach and very close to the National Swimming Centre’s 50m pool.

It is also sad, as the drowning statistics in Fiji are horrific.  The drowning rate here is seven times the rate in Australia.

“FIJI has recorded the highest drowning rate per capita with a total of 75 lives being lost from water-based activities last year.

 

And the Water Safety Council of Fiji Steering Committee confirmed that this drowning figure was more compared to Australia that has a population of 22.8million as of September last year.

Committee convenor John Philip revealed this in an interview yesterday saying the drowning per capita rate used to be 4.5 times worse than Australia. However, he said last year, it was almost seven times worse.” Source: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=231902drown 1

“STATISTICS show there were 270 drowning deaths in Fiji between 2008 and 2012, and that last year’s figure was the highest at 75 cases.

 

Speaking at the International World Water Safety Day celebrations in Suva yesterday, Minister for Youth and Sport Commander Viliame Naupoto said the drowning toll recorded so far for this year was 11.

He said seven drowning-related deaths were recorded during the first 22 days of this year alone.

“The harsh reality of these drowning fatalities is that 25 children under the age of 10 were left unsupervised in or around water,” Cdr Naupoto said.

“I would like to reverse this trend with a different twist and create a different set of statistics that read three lives saved every day through successfully learning how to swim.

“That would mean that we will have a target of 1095 able swimmers for this year.”

He said drowning was preventable and those dedicated to water safety knew there was no magic bullet to prevent drowning and that people needed to follow water safety steps.

“A lack of awareness of water safety, particularly in relation to our children, is an issue that can bring tragedy to anyone, anywhere and at any time.

“Keeping watch and being vigilant is the key to eliminating child drowning and preventing new drowning.” The WHO estimates that 388,000 people die through worldwide every year.” Source: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=228002

drown 2Drowning is not an issue for only toddlers or infants.  Drowning is an issue is particular in High School age children, through to adulthood, according to the 2012 Drowning Report of the Australian Royal Life Saving Society 2012.  Source: http://www.royallifesaving.com.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/4002/2012-Drowning-Report.pdf

Drowning is a preventable death.  It is only preventable if children (and adults) learn swimming, life saving and survival techniques (such as floating or treading water), and resuscitation skills.  How will they learn if not incorporated as compulsory in the school curriculum?

Suva Olympic Pool, you can see the sea in the background. Source: Fiji Sun

One would assume (or I did at least) that since Fiji is a nation of islands, that Fijians as a group would know how to swim.  This is not the case at all.  One rarely sees Fijians swimming in the ocean.  There are only two pools in Suva.  The Olympic Pool in Suva City, right near the water front is only open from 10am to 6pm Monday to Friday, and 8am to 6pm on Saturday.  Even if kids or adults wanted to train in the mornings, they couldn’t.  If you visit the pool on any given day, you could literally fire a gun, and not risk hitting anyone!

There is also the Damodar City Aquatic Centre (at the National Fitness Centre).

There are, as far as I know in fact no other public pools in Fiji.  I also do not know of any school that has their own pool.  If I am wrong, I welcome your feedback.

Why is the risk of drowning over the age of 15 years much higher than before that age?  Is it because at this age, compulsory school swimming is not a priority, and that over 15 years the parents assume that the kids have learned to swim by osmosis, and leave them unsupervised to play with their friends?

In April this year, one of Fiji’s great leaders and chiefs, Tui Macuata, a champion of the environment and conservation passed away by drowning.  His fishing boat capsized.  It was reported that his companions stayed with him for as long as they could.  When the chief lost his strength, his companions prayed for him, then swam to shore to raise the alarm.  The manner of his passing is tragic.

“They had gone fishing in the Tui Macuata’s 115-horsepower speed boat. He had just returned from Suva and when he wants to relax he comes to the village and goes fishing,” Mr Foster said. “Their boat started taking in water around 2am in the morning and the three had been sleeping. When Tui Macuata woke up he alerted the other two.”
According to Mr Foster, the boat capsized shortly afterwards. “They swam two kilometres from where they were. When they were swimming he informed his tavale (Ratu Peni Vulaca), that he was getting tired and weak; Tui Macuata was hanging onto his tavale’s Tee-shirt.
“They were fishing at the barrier reef where there are strong currents. The two prayed with him and continued swimming.”  Source: http://www.fijisun.com.fj/?p=149828

The late Chief was only 57.  I pose the following questions:

Was the chief fully clothed whilst trying to swim?  Lifesaving training teaches you to take off as much clothing as possible in a survival situation.

Did the Chief’s companions know that a person who is drowning will try and hold on to the rescuer, and risk drowning them also?  In a survival situation, talk to the swimmer and encourage them to float on their back, so that you can grip them under the chin, and the rescuer can then either tread water keeping the nose and mouth of the person above water, or holding the chin, sidestroke to safety.  In extreme situations where the victim starts to panic, you can knock them out, and then grip them under the chin and tread water or side stroke to safety.  In survival situations, a prayer may be a good calming device, but it did little to save the Chief so that he could continue his great work.

tui macuata

Mourners carry the funeral mats at Tui Macuata’s funeral. Source https://www.facebook.com/VodafoneAthFijiFoundation

The late Chief received the 2006 Global Conservation Award. http://www.seaweb.org/getinvolved/oceanvoices/ratuaisea.php.

At the beginning of this blog, I was going to simply post a few photos of one of the elite schools in Suva City, Fiji, as a reflection of the state of education here.  I got side tracked a bit, but my point is still the same I think.

IMGP7361

Outside the main administration office, Suva Grammar

Anyway, to continue, as there are no sports or swimming at our son’s High School, and he has successfully found his feet in Fiji after moving from Australia, we decided to search for another School.  Last Friday, we had an appointment with one of the most prestigious schools in Fiji, Suva Grammar.  On entering the school, I was shocked and dismayed at the state of the interior.  The floors and walls are filthy.  Tiles peeling off the floors, walls covered in the grime of maybe 20 years.  It had a depressing atmosphere.  I did not bother to visit the toilets.  It made me think, as I often do when visiting other public buildings and campuses here.  The toilets at the Fiji National University Koronivia Campus are third world.  No toilet tissue, no soap, and the smell is overwhelming.

What are we teaching the young people destined to become leaders in Fiji and the Pacific?  If we look at the state of Suva Grammar, are we teaching them that THIS IS THE BEST THAT YOU CAN EXPECT?  THIS IS ALL THAT YOU ARE WORTH?

IMGP7360

Outside the Principal’s Office, Suva Grammar

IMGP7355

The stairwell that leads from the main office to the Principal’s Office, Suva Grammar

Why would we expect them to have pride in their education if we do not value them enough to keep it clean?  Why would we expect that children would learn to swim if they are given no opportunity?  Why are so few Fijians educated to tertiary level?  Fijian tertiary enrollment numbers are 114th in the world per capita.  If education at a prestigious school is not what they hoped, why would they be interested in further education?  If Fijians are to be educated about environmental issues, where do we start?

 

 

 

Getting around Fiji – part two – taxi driver phone contacts -Suva City, Nadi airport and Suva airport/Nausori

Getting a taxi in Fiji is normally easy, unless of course you are in a hurry and really need one.  Then, Murphy’s law applies.

To phone a taxi, you normally need the driver’s number.  In the Suva/Nausori area, most drivers will come anywhere you need, and travel freely along the corridor (Kings Road and Princess Road).  You can book a taxi in advance, or call as you need.  It is a good idea to have a few numbers stored as if you are in Nausori at the Suva airport, and the driver is stuck in Suva, you will wait about half an hour or more.

If you know another reputable driver in another area and want to add their details, please respond below.  See also, Getting around Part One – tips, mobile phones, ATMs.

Suva Airport area (Nausori area) reputable licensed taxis

Atish +679 9216093

Soni +679 9212511

Deo +679 9953568

Satea +679 9724312

Saleim (modern 5 seater van with luggage space) +679 9425271

Forum Taxis (very quick service) +679 9337818  /+679 8400402/ +679 7192710 forum.taxis@gmail.com

Suva City areaIMGP0198

Bau Taxis (Vinesh) +679 9953521

Saleim (modern 5 seater van with luggage space) +679 9425271

Ali +679 9667994

Forum Taxis (very quick service) +679 9337818  /+679 8400402/ +679 7192710 forum.taxis@gmail.com

Nadi Airport to Suva City/ Suva City door to door pick up to Nadi Airport

Safe Shuttle Service – modern sedans $25 per person, will pick up and drop off door to door +679 8777047 (Tiko)

Getting around Fiji Part One – Transport tips Nadi to Suva, ATMs, Mobile Phones

IMGP0993

Buses lined up at Suva Bus Stand

If you are planning to travel in Fiji – here are some tips to help you in your travels.  There is so much to tell, so this is Part One.  For additional info see also Part Two with taxi driver numbers and contacts.

IMGP2413Nadi (pronounced Nandi) to Suva by plane

Flying into Fiji is so memorable, and I always love it.  You know when you are approaching Fiji as after flying over open ocean for hours, suddenly you see billowing clouds that go up and up into the heavens.  They seem so solid, and are in layers, one on top of the other.  If you are travelling to Nadi International airport, as you arrive there will be a little troupe of singers to welcome you, and also see you off.  Many tourists do not know what to make of this, but it is really a welcome sight and sound for homecomers to Fiji.  The group normally has a wooden box on a stand for tips/gratuities.  I encourage you to support them as wages here in Fiji are very low, and every dollar counts.IMGP3269

If you are getting a connecting flight, after you go through customs, go out the door and turn right, and walk over to Domestic check in.  Don’t delay, as there is often a long line.  Once you check in, you can go outside for some fresh air, or get a drink or whatever.  If you have been told that your bags will be checked right through to Suva, and you don’t get your bags through customs at International, you will have to run back for them, and risk missing your connection.  I have done this once.

As Nadi International is the first port of call, you must get your bags through customs.  Coming back however, if you check your bags at Suva and then are going through Nadi to your overseas destination, you will not have to collect your bags, they will be sent straight through to your connection.  There are toilets once you get down the escalator at the baggage claim.

IMGP0198Mobile Phones -There is also a vodafone shop as at the airport where you can get your Fiji Vodoafone sim or internet wireless device (dongle/flashnet etc).  Note:  you must have a handset that its unlocked, and not locked to any network as if you try and use an Australian Vodafone prepay phone, it is locked to Vodafone Australia, and the Fijian sim card won’t work!  Otherwise a dual sim phone is handy.

IMGP0764

Elliot, Dom and Roni at Suva/Nausori airport

The overhead lockers in the Nadi to Suva flight are very small, so make sure that your carry on baggage is within the limits for your own sake and the comfort of all.

The trip from Nadi to Suva by plane takes 23 minutes.  Suva airport is not really in Suva, it is in Nausori.

Nadi to Suva by Road : Taxi, Bus, Minibus, Safe Shuttle, Hire Car?

To get from Nausori airport to Suva City, you have to get a taxi, bus or minibus.  Taxi costs around $25FJD.  Make sure that you confirm the fare with the driver first.  If he says he is going to put you on the meter, that is fine, as the meter will show about $25. Sometimes, you can negotiate a bit of a lower rate, depending on the driver and time of day.  If you are on a budget, get a taxi to Nausori Bus stand.  At the bus stand, there are the local buses to Suva (fare $1.60FJD).  Also, there are minibuses just next to the bus stand near the Mobil service station.  You just get on – sometimes they are very crowded, so if you have baggage, you need to pay for the seat for your bags.  Fare to Suva is $1.50FJD.  There are also express coaches such as the Sunbeam, Intercities, and Pacific.  They are comfortable, and you can put your luggage underneath the bus.  The fare to Suva is still only around the $2 mark.  It is not my favourite way to travel though as it gets very hot inside sometimes.  I prefer the buses with the open windows.

The trip to Suva by taxi takes about 25 minutes if there is not too much traffic, by local bus about 45 minutes, and by coach about 30 minutes.

IMGP7093

Local bus

There is also a smaller bus (about a 30 seater) that goes from the Nausori bus stand about every 20 minutes.  Just ask anyone to show you the Princess Road Bus, or as the “Back road Bus”.  This is by far my favourite way to travel to Suva if you get a chance.  Rather than going on Kings Road, it goes the back way through the mountains, past Colo-i-Suva which is in the rainforrest, through Tacirua (pronounced Tathirua) and Tamavua, and then down Edinborough Drive to Suva Bus stand.  The fare is $2 and it takes about the same time as the local bus.  The trip is so beautiful though, and it really gives you a feeling of being in Fiji.

Tips

  • There are some services which operate outside of Nadi Airport.
  • Hire car – I know you can hire a car, but I have never done it, and if you are not experienced on driving the Queens Road Highway, it may be best to think twice, especially in bad weather.
  • Express Bus – the Sunbeam stops outside Nadi Domestic terminal.
  • Taxi – all airport taxis are painted yellow, and the standard fare to town is $15.

    IMGP0278

    Licenced Minivan

  • To get to town cheaper, walk outside the airport, and cross over the road.  Wait on the side of the road for a minibus to Nadi.  Just hail any van that has the initials LM for licenced minivan on the numberplate.  The fare is $1.50. Once you get to town if you are going by taxi, ask them to drop you at the minivan stand at the bus stand in Nadi.  If you are going by minibus, they will normally drop you off outside Jacks Department Store.

    IMGP1967

    The road from Nausori/Suva airport on the way to Suva

  • It is a 5 minute walk to the bus stand, or minivan stand which is behind the market.  If you are worried about asking where the bus stand is, just ask where the market is, and you will see it.  All of the Fijian people I have met are very keen to help you and show you where to go, often accompanying you.  They love to find out where you are from.  Don’t be put off by this, as your place of origin is very important here in Fiji.  Fijians are very attached to their birthplace, and mothers and fathers villages, so they will often ask two questions: Where are you from (where were you born), and where do you stay (where do you live now away from your birthplace).  For example, Fijians who live in Suva but were not born there will make the distinction that they “stay” in Suva, but are “from” Gau.

    DSCF0755

    Suva to Nadi plane

  • The minivan stand is where you can find a “return” taxi to Suva, or a minivan.  The cost of return taxi or minivan to Suva is about $20 to $25 per person.  If you hire a whole taxi, you can travel to Suva in comfort for about $100 negotiated.
  • If you are traveling by minibus, and have luggage, you have to pay for 2 or 3 seats so a taxi is just as cheap.  Minivans are notoriously dangerous, so many Fijians out of concern for you will advise you not to travel that way, even though they do so themselves due to financial constraints.
  • There is also a service called the “Safe Shuttle Service”.  This service takes passengers from Nadi airport to Suva or any place in between.  They have clean, modern cars, and you book in advance.  It is $25 per person, or $100 if you want to hire the whole car.  Returning, they will pick you up from your door.  Best to phone in advance and talk to Tiko phone +679 8777047. Their base is near the sea wall outside the Olympic Pool in Suva.

IMGP0720Tips General once you get settled

  • Taxis are recognisable by the numberplate which starts with LT (for licenced taxi).
  • Minibuses have numberplates that start with LM (licenced minibus).
  • Some taxis do not have the little taxi sign on the top, but if they have the numberplate, they are licenced.
  • To tell where a minibus is going, their route is written on the side of the bus – for example Nausori/Suva/Nausori.
  • You can hail a minibus anywhere along the road, and if it is going in the right direction, it will stop.
  • You pay the minibus driver when you get out of the minibus.

    IMGP0020

    Elliot, Dom, Roni at Nausori Bus stand

  • You don’t have to tip taxi drivers, and if you do, they will be very happy if you just round it up to the nearest dollar, and will STILL try and give you back the 10 cents!  Taxi drivers in Fiji are a really nice bunch.  Often students earning extra money, or retirees.  They are a great source of information.
  • Taxi drivers will often try and give you their number – TAKE IT, as there is no central number to call if you want a taxi.  You call the drivers you know and see if they are free.  Also, you can book them in advance for a negotiated fare back to the airport, or if you want to go on a longer trip.
  • All taxis have a little red sticker on the top of their numberplate on the bumper bar.  It says where they are based.  For example, you will see “Suva City”, “Nadi Town”, “Suva Rural” which is near Colo-i-Suva rainforest park and Tamavua, “Nausori Town” etc.  Why does this matter? See next tip…
  • If you see a taxi driver or minibus driver flashing their lights at you while you are waiting at a bus stop or by the side of the road, that means they want to know if you want to get it.  Flashing lights from a taxi often means that they are returning to base and want a return fare.  This is very handy, as if you are on the way from Nausori or another town, heading back to Suva, and you can get a return cab, the fare is between 70 cents and $2 depending on the distance.  You would be safe if you gave $2 for any of these trips.  Make sure before you get in that you ask the driver if he is a “return”.  If he says no, he will put you on the meter.  The meter fare from Nausori to Suva is about $20 to $25.

    IMGP0176

    Tom on the bus

  • If you see a minibus flashing their headlights, it means that they have a spare seat if you want it.
  • To hail a bus, minibus or taxi, you put your arm out at about 45 degrees, and make a downward motion with your handIMGP8167
  • If a fellow passenger taps you on the leg, it doesn’t mean that they are keen on you, it means that they want you to ring the bell for them
  • If you have a lot of shopping, you can put it behind the driver on the bus, or on the gearbox cover.
  • If you have vegetables with dirt on them such as a bundle of root crops which you should take if you are visiting someone, you put them under the bus in the open section, and when you get off, tell the driver you are getting your things.  When you have them out of the compartment, slap on the side of the bus to let the driver know that you are OK for him to go.
  • If you hear people making a kissing sound with their lips, it also doesn’t mean that they are keen on you or another passenger.  You often hear it on the minibus.  That is the noise people make to alert the driver that they want him to stop at the next bus stop.  Many ladies simply say loudly “bus stop driver”, but men make the kissing sound.  The kissing sound is also how you can hail a taxi.

    IMGP4851

    Suva bus stand

  • If you hear a car beeping its horn behind you as you are walking, it is a taxi driver asking if you need a ride.  They will do this often, as most Fijians do not have cars, and taxis are so cheap, it is a very popular mode of transport especially after shopping.  Normally just a couple of dollars if you are going from the market to home.IMGP6619
  • A quick note on shopping – if you are in Suva or Nausori market, or other large markets, there are wheelbarrow boys.  They will carry your shopping to the bus or taxi stand for you for $1 or $2.

ATMs

There are so many ANZ ATMs in Fiji, and also many Westpac ATMs.  You can get out up to $900 FJD at one time, and the cost at transaction is around $9FJD.  Both my Australian cards work at the ANZ, but only one of them works at Westpac and BSP (Bank of South Pacific).  There are ANZ ATMs at both Nadi and Suva airports, and at many supermarkets.

IMGP5146IMGP6914IMG_8772DSCF0884IMG_2144IMGP2654 IMGP0215 IMGP6399  IMG_2254 IMG_2155  IMGP0025 rainbow suva harb 1   IMGP0729 IMGP0278     IMGP1041 IMGP0717  IMGP6724 IMGP7012