Humble Beginnings – Royal Chickens

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Well, in case anyone has been wondering just how I have been going with my chickens, from the humble beginnings of the plastic bottle chicken house,IMG_0009 I decided to take a photo.  I couldn’t fit all the chickens in one picture, and of course there are now lots of little ones in the house, which don’t come outside yet except as “supervised play” in the afternoons.  The small ones, I have learned with heartache, are the favourite food of the Indian Mongoose which is very crafty, and can catch a chicken and drag it into its burrow at lightning speed.

IMG_0013The white chickens in the photo are cockerels (male chickens).  The started out as very unassuming birds, but now, well to me they look like royalty!  The are so majestic with their manes and their bright red combs.

The red and black chickens are Junglee birds – or native chickens.  They are also changing day by day and will one day be clothed in gold, red, green and black feathers like the old fashioned roosters of yesteryear.  I am planning to win a prize at next year’s agricultural show with one of them!

The plain red chickens are rescued battery hens.  They still lay the odd egg, and they keep the roosters happy.

I wish I had taken a week by week picture so I could show how they grow, but I might do that next time.

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Another use for old umbrellas – doggie bed of dreams!

A couple of months ago, our neighbours’ dogs had puppies.  About a week after that, mysteriously, all the girl puppies were dumped in our yard.  They were skinny, ridden with fleas, and starving.  I decided that I had not much choice but to bath them, and care for them until they were old enough for me to find homes for them.  People here in Fiji often dump female puppies as they are not wanted.  There is an SPCA here, and they welcome unwanted animals, but animal welfare in Fiji is very much developing, and is at the lower end of the scale.

Snowy and Patch now have new homes with some lovely families who love animals.  Blackie has stayed with us.  She now has commandeered our umbrella cushion as her doggie bed of dreams.  To see how to make a cushion or dog bed from recycled broken umbrellas, click here.

I wanted to post these pictures to show my cyber friend Jo, who makes all kinds of cool stuff from recycled umbrellas and just sent me a tote bag in the mail.  She has a stall in the UK and an etsy stall.  Her bag is so well made and holds about 25kg of shopping!  I use it daily.  Thanks Jo!  To see her stuff including bicycle paniers, bags, painting smocks, and more, click here.  Maybe soon she will be selling dog beds!

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Blackie, Snowy and Patch a couple of days after they arrived

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Blackie on her bed make of recycled umbrellas

Plastic bottle chicken house – complete!

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Finally, I am posting photos of the completed chicken house!  It has been operational for about a month and a half now, and the chickens are now much bigger than in these pictures.

I can confirm that it is working well, with a feeder made from a recycled kerosene burner, the drinker installed in the wall and also poweraid bottles which are perfect chicken drinkers!  It looks like a stained glass chicken palace now, and is a bit of a local attraction.

I can also confirm that it is definitely mongoose proof, dog proof, pig proof and cat proof!  Ahhh, the sweet smell of success!  Next post on this will be pictures of the rescued battery hens which are now happily laying an egg each a day!  Thanks for the encouragement.

I think that with the sheer weight of bottles and concrete (one 1 litre bottle filled with water weighs 1kg) that it should also be cyclone proof.  Everything in the construction was salvaged except for the chicken wire.  Hooray, about 1000 bottles not on the beach!

To see pics of construction process click here.

Natalei Eco Lodge – a hidden treasure

Images Of Fiji

IMG_2616 Last weekend, we went to Natalei Eco Lodge.  Contact information, maps, activities here . The website seems to indicate that it is in the Yasawas, but it isn’t.  It is on the main island, Viti Levu, not too far from Suva and Nausori (where Suva airport is located).  IMG_2416

It is amazing!  Out of all of the places I have stayed in Fiji, this is one of the best.  Not in terms of luxury, but in terms of being a real Fiji experience.  If you only get to stay one place and want to leave Fiji with a feeling of what Fiji really is about, then you should go to Natalei.  It is only $75 per person per night including all food.

I took so many pictures, I couldn’t decide what to leave out, so I have added a few too many really.

IMG_2436Natalei is one of the only places that…

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Skirts for men, or everything you always wanted to know about the sulu

I recently came across this on the internet.  I loved it so much I “reblogged” it.  I hope you like it too.

From Seattle To Suva

The humble wraparound skirt fashioned from a big square of cloth you tie or wrap around your waist  has multiple names: sarong (Indonesia), lava-lava (Samoa), laplap (Papua New Guinea), and in Fiji, the sulu.  You see a fair amount of the sarong-style beach coverup sulus as casual wear and (duh) at the beach. Since it’s impolite for a woman to show her thighs when visiting a Fijian village, tourist ladies are advised to wear shorts, carry a sulu in their purse or rucksack and then do a quick wrap and tuck of the sulu right before arriving at the village.

It’s perfectly acceptable for men or women to wear this kind of sulu in daily life, but since it has to be tied or tucked, there’s always the chance it might not stay on if someone steps on the hem when you get off the bus, and thus, you usually see…

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Making a chicken house out of plastic bottles – part one

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Chicken house in progress

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Top of completed wall

Recently, as those who know me are aware, I have been busying myself making a chicken house using hundreds of plastic bottles collected from the neighbourhood.

  • Step one – collect bottles
  • Step two – fill with food colouring and water and screw lids on tightly
  • Step three – dig a shallow trench about half the depth of a bottle lying down to anchor the wall

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    Plastic bottle wall in progress

  • Step four – fill the trench with bottles about half a bottle width apart
  • Step  five – mix concrete (about one 40kg bag of cement to five 25kg bags of sand)
  • Step six – put concrete between the bottom layer of bottles and start stacking the bottles on top, row by row
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    Step one: dig a trench and fill with bottles

  • Steps seven to infinity – stay tuned – I have grand plans!   We will see whether they eventuate, but my grand design should incorporate the following:

  • I have already poked holes in several bottles to make some ventilation and drainage for the lower wall
  • I am going to insert some 30 Litre yellow plastic cooking oil drums into the wall with an opening on the outside for filling and catching rain water, and an opening on the inside for the chickens to drink from
  • I am going to use guttering and a vertical stack of linked 30 litre plastic drums to collect rain water and auto fill the drinkers
  • I have collected dumped kerosine stoves to use as the roof ventilation vents
  • I have already made a prototype of a roof whirlybird ventilator out of a 2 litre coke bottle
  • I have already planted pawpaw seeds outside the sunniest wall
  • I am going to insert wooden fruit boxes into the wall as nesting boxes, with hatches for egg collecting on the outside
  • I may even insert a fresh water pond inside for growing small fish and for the chickens to drink from
  • the whole thing has to be mongoose proof!

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    One wall completed

Also, since I saw the flip flop art, it occurred to me that I could even partly shingle the roof with flipflops for insulation from the heat, but I am not sure… otherwise since I saw the angel wing flip flop art, perhaps I will breed artistic chooks, and install an art piece inside for their viewing pleasure.

It reminds me a little of one of my favourite books to read to the kids when they were little.  It was called “The Hilton Hen House”.

The construction is coming along so nicely that the teenagers are asking whether we can scrap the chickens and they can move into it as a teenage hangout.  I think that it will be really lovely actually, and am determined to sleep in there one night before we put the chickens in.

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Filling the bottles with water and food colouring

I know they make this kind of construction elsewhere in the world and make houses, schools and other structures, but I never realized it would be so easy (and fun).  If people here in Fiji who live in settlements (slums) had access to the money for concrete, the bottles are free.

Even the timber and iron has been salvaged and saved from landfill.

Perhaps I will write a grant proposal after this is finished.  A great video on the squatter settlement conditions is online at http://www.smh.com.au/multimedia/world/fijis-squatter-settlements-20091127-jwda.html

Recycled umbrella tote bags, bicycle paniers, and more….

umbrella bag

Photo source: http://www.etsy.com

People are so smart!  A while ago, I got a comment from a reader in the UK who upcycles umbrellas into tote bags and sells them through her etsy shop.  She also uses the umbrellas to make bicycle paniers, painting smocks, bunting and more.  She tells me that one rainy weekend, she collected over  60 discarded umbrellas!

I thought that it was worth posting a link for any readers who are interested in placing an order at http://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/176803426/upcycled-umbrella-tote-bag?ref=shop_home_active_1

The maker is the lovely Jo Bodley, and she has a written “how to” on her blog http://carminabiryani.blogspot.com/

Jo contacted me after seeing my attempt at making bean bags out of broken umbrellas.

Thanks so much Jo!  In the UK, you seem to have some beautiful umbrella fabrics!  In Fiji, the choice of trash to treasure is more limited.  I am going to give the tote bags a try, after I finish making my chicken house out of plastic bottle bricks filled with coloured water.