Suva’s Iconic Past being restored – but what about the rubbish?

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The old Grand Pacific Hotel, opposite Albert Park and the Government Buildings, now undergoing restoration, and due to re-open in 2014.

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Lovers look on as a fridge bobs in Suva Harbour in downtown Suva

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Daily view of rubbish on the beach in Downtown Suva

 

Recently there was an article in the newspaper here in Fiji about a wonderful project to restore the old iconic buildings and gardens in Downtown Suva (for online copy of the article by Graham Davis, click here).  This is a great project, but my concern is – once the work is done, and locals and tourists come to the area, if they look up they will see the beauty of “Old Suva”, currently a faded beauty, and the glory of Suva Harbour, if they look down, they will see hundreds of polystyrene lunch containers that say “Bula” (which means Hello or Welcome) or “Fiji”, co-mingled with plastic drink bottles, aluminum cans, tyres, backpacks and allmanner of other rubbish all along the beach and the sea wall promenade.  Recently I saw a fridge floating about two meters from shore in Suva Harbour outside the Fish Market.  One idea in my response below:

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Polystyrene lunch container “Bula” floats in Suva Harbour outside the Suva City Council Offices

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The Peace Park on Suva Harbour

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Disused fountain in Thurston Gardens, near the Fiji Museum

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The sea wall promenade near the Suva City Council Offices, with a seaplane parked at the Holiday Inn, and the old Grand Pacific Hotel in the background.

I read your article with interest in the paper recently. While it is wonderful news that there are moves to restore the Government Buildings, the old Grand Pacific Hotel and the strip along the sea wall, I wonder if any of the supporters of this project have recently taken a walk along the sea wall? I do not have a car here in Fiji, so I walk or ride the bus. From that vantage point, on any and every day of the week, you can see recyclables, and rubbish by the tonne along the walkway and small beaches that dot the sea wall. Notably, it seems that the majority of garbage dumped on the nature strips and beaches seems to be outside where the Government employees take their lunch. If you look at the beach outside FIRCA, the beach outside the Suva City Council Buildings, and the beach outside the Government Office Tower, you will see the remnants of daily lunches. It is a strange twist of fate that many of the polystyrene “lunch packs” that are used at almost every take away shop say “Bula” or “Fiji”. This is quite embarrassing really. There are also no recycling bins at all that I have seen either along the sea wall, or in Suva City, or anywhere else. Recycling bins must be a priority for those in authority, as there are approximately 44 million PET plastic drink bottles in Fiji every year (that figure though was from 2003). What use the mantra of Reduce, Reuse, Recycle if there are no public place recycling bins. Coca Cola Amatil and Fiji Water have a joint program where they will collect the bottles and pay per kilogram, plus all aluminum cans. Surely Suva City Council could arrange this, and if they need assistance, I am happy to facilitate.
Could part of the cause of the problem be that much of the recyclables and garbage is not visible if traveling by car, and that many in authority have a driver and a vehicle?
Part of the solution could be a “plain clothes Friday” for all government and council administrative staff – a lunch time barbeque could be provided on the beach, and a weekly show of civic duty to pick up one’s own lunch rubbish could be exhibited. Recently we did a

clean up on a 5km stretch of a rural dirt road in Koronivia, and collected more than 1,200 bags of rubbish and recycling.
Cleaning up sporadically is not a solution, and too often every article in the paper about clean ups mentions this or that community group, but does not mention or tally WHAT was collected. Once we learn that the rubbish needs to be tallied,and the results published, then maybe we

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Thurston Gardens, Suva

will get some action. Fiji is abundant in beauty and resources, and could be a leader in the Pacific if we learn how to deal with recycling, and fast!
Recycling bins can even be made from the plastic bottles, so very little expenditure is needed. I am being contacted by communities across Fiji who want to recycle, and just need someone to help them to get it organized. If you or your readers wish to be involved, please feel free to contact me.

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Could one simple idea help solve the problem of how to get recycling going in Fiji?

 

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Bins made out of PET bottles

Could this one simple idea be part of the solution to community education and a call to action for recycling of PET bottles and aluminum cans in Fiji?  Picture Source: http://www.designsclue.com/15-best-ideas-of-how-to-recycle-plastic-bottles/

The below photos are all taken in Suva City Fiji, Levuka (Ovalau Island, Fiji), Samabula (Suva City), Nakasi (on the Suva Nausori corridor), Nausori, Rewa River bank at Manoca Estates Nausori.  Even in the tranquil looking photographs, see if you can spot the floating PET bottles.  If you drive by, or stand on the river bank of the Rewa River, Nausori, which flows directly into Suva Harbour at Laucala Bay, you may not be aware of what lurks every 5 meters down the river bank.  Take a look over the edge, and you will see dump site after dump site of rubbish, PET bottles, recycling, cardboard, car parts, washing machines, tyres, fans, daipers.  All of this is regularly set alight (normally on Friday afternoons), or if heavy rains come, it is washed into the sea.  As the Rewa Delta is prone to flooding, at least once a year, a great proportion of this is washed into the ocean.

 

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Koronivia Road, Fiji

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Koronivia Road, Fiji, the large bag is the recycling bag provided by Coca Cola Amatil in partnership with Fiji Water – the only concession to recycling here. I had to get a taxi which cost $40 to collect the bag myself as a few weeks ago, Coca Cola would not drop them off anywhere.

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Makoi, near Hanson’s Supermarket, Nasinu, Fiji

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The alleyway between the Chinese restaurant and the Immanuel Christian Fellowship Church, Nabua, Suva City, Fiji

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Suva City, the sea wall near the Holiday Inn.

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The beach outside the Suva City Council Offices, Suva Fiji

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Daily Skip bin, Suva City Markets, Fiji

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The beach outside the Presidential Palace and Fiji Inland Revenue and Customs Authority Building, Queen Elizabeth Drive, Suva City

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The beach opposite the Suva City Council Buildings and Sakuna Park (near McDonalds), downtown Suva City, Fiji

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My location, Koronivia, Fiji

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Fire burning rubbish in downtown Suva, on the sea wall area between Suva City Library and the Holiday Inn.

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The beach in downtown Suva City opposite the Government Office Tower

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Street bottle collector, Muhammad Ali, with his bags of PET bottles that he salvages from rubbish bins outside the Suva City Council Offices, the Government Towers, and the rubbish bins of Suva City. He walks miles to take these bottles back to the Coca Cola Amatil factory for $1FJD per kg, or washes them at the Mobil service station on Victoria Pde, and sells them to the juice sellers at Suva City Market.

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Polystyrene lunch packs and plastic bags in downtown Suva City, by the sea wall near Tiko’s floating restaurant. Every one of the white polystyrene packs say “Bula” or “Fiji” so if you see one washed up on your beach you know where it is from. Maybe they should change the words to “From Fiji with love”

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MH Supermarket, Nakasi, Fiji. Note the small red bucket near the door that serves as the only bin.

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Rubbish at the bus stop, Nakasi, Fiji

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Rubbish and recyclables in the drain at the bus stop, Nakasi, Fiji

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Fiji Water bottle floats quietly towards the sea, downtown Suva, Terry Walk, Nubukalau Creek outside MHCC department store.

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Garbage bags full of daipers and PET bottles dumped in Koronivia Creek at the Fiji National University, Koronivia Road, Fiji

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Contents of 10 garbage bags of rubbish dumped in Koronivia Creek, Fiji National University, Koronivia, Fiji

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Rubbish Koronivia Road, Fiji

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Household rubbish dumped on Kings Road, between Nakasi and Nausori, near Koronivia Research Station, and Fiji National University Farms.

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Plastic computer monitor disintegrates slowly in creek at Fiji National University Farm, Koronivia, Fiji

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Plastics mixed with household rubbish, found in creek, Koronivia Research Station Farm, Fiji

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Rubbish dumped over the bridge, downtown Suva, outside the fish market on Nubukalau creek.

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Plastic MH supermarket bag floating in Suva Harbour

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Coke bottles float in Suva Harbour, downtown Suva City outside Tiko’s floating restaurant

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Small boat moored near Tiko’s floating restaurant, downtown Suva City, with Coke bottle

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Plastic Coke bottle Suva Harbour

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Rubbish on beach in Suva City, opposite Sakuna Park and McDonalds

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Close up of rubbish and recyclables on beach in Suva City, opposite Sakuna Park

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Rubbish and recyclables on beach daily opposite Government Office Tower and Suva City Council Buildings, Suva City, Suva Harbour. Tiko’s restaurant floats in the background.

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Tyres and assorted rubbish and recyclables on beach in Suva City, opposite Government Buildings

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Private rubbish dump, Koronivia Road, Fiji. Once a week, the dump is set on fire to burn rubbish, daipers, plastics, glass, recyclables. The smell of burning plastics is overwhelming.

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Recyclable PET bottles flattened by vehicles at the junction of Kings Road and Koronivia Road, Fiji

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Rubbish and PET plastic bottles on the beach right outside the fence to the pool at the Holiday Inn, downtown central Suva City. The Suva City Council Office is also next door.

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Rubbish and plastic bottles dumped in Koronivia Creek, Fiji

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Rubbish, plastics, PET bottles, at Samabula, outside BSP bank, Fiji, near Suva City

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Street person sleeping in doorway of shops near BSP bank, Samabula, Suva City. At least he has recycled bottles and packaging.

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One of two full trucks that took away 10 tonnes of rubbish from a 5km stretch of rural road from Koronivia to Lokia, Fiji, collected in one morning by 300 volunteers.

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Council workers and residents with the big recycling bag – the only avenue for recycling for a very limited number of Fijians.

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Rubbish, PET bottles, recyclables, plastics, collect on the roadside between Nausori and Suva (this photo in Koronivia on Kings Road at FNU research farm) after being thrown from buses and cars.

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Large bags of rubbish and plastics are regularly dumped in creeks and drains, Koronivia, Fiji

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Rubbish and plastics awaiting collection to go to landfill near the beach at Levuka, Ovalau Island, Fiji. The stand is to try and keep dogs away. Children swim in the sea in the background.

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Rubbish, plastics, tyres wash up on the beach at Levuka, Ovalau Island, Fiji

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Plastic PET bottles, aluminum cans, and other rubbish is thrown into the sea at Natovi Landing, Viti Levu, Fiji. This is the place where you can get the boat from Suva to Savusavu on Vanua Levu, and Levuka, on Ovalau. There is a canteen at the landing (jetty) but no bins.

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Rubbish, plastics, PET, cans collect along the roadside everywhere. Photo taken on the road between Nausori and Bau landing (Viti Levu), rural Fiji.

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Government ship yards, Suva City, Suva Harbour, Fiji

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Rubbish, PET bottles dumped in Nausori, Manoca Estates, at the edge of the Rewa River

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Opposite the Mobil service station, Nausori, Fiji, Rewa River. Rubbish, plastics, PET bottles are dumped daily and burned as part of business practice.

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Another rubbish dump for local businesses and households on the edge of the Rewa River, Nausori, Fiji. These rubbish dumps are all along the river, spaced out by about only 5 or 10 metres.

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Another rubbish dump, Rewa River, Nausori, Fiji

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Yet another rubbish dump, banks of the Rewa River, Nausori, Fiji

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Five meters further down, another rubbish dump on the banks of the Rewa River, Nausori, Fiji

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The view from the same spot, Manoca Estates, Nausori, Fiji, on the banks of the Rewa River, if you don’t look over the side. Maybe that is why people don’t know! You can’t see the rubbish from a car or bus. Most government employees have a staff driver, and they travel in SUVs.

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And again, the next rubbish dump, Rewa River

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And another!

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And another!

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The same private rubbish dump pictured above, across the road from my home, Koronivia Fiji. This rubbish has collected since 8th June when it was cleared during the clean up. It is regularly set on fire. It contains many many PET bottles, glass bottles, aluminum cans, as well as daipers, rotting food and cardboard. This was taken yesterday 8 July. It burned for many hours and the smoke haze could be seen for kilometers. The smell is choking. This dump is directly opposite the shop that has a recycling bag, and is used by only two families.

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Rubbish that has accumulated from two families in Koronivia Fiji being set on fire last night, 8 July. All the rubbish has accumulated in one month. It contains plastics, PET, aluminum cans, daipers, cardboard, food waste. This is the only option for many people in Fiji. There is no rubbish collection here, and even though there is a recycling bag for these families, right at their house, they are not motivated enough to use it. People here do not see the benefit of separating rubbish.

Getting around Fiji – part two – taxi driver phone contacts -Suva City, Nadi airport and Suva airport/Nausori

Getting a taxi in Fiji is normally easy, unless of course you are in a hurry and really need one.  Then, Murphy’s law applies.

To phone a taxi, you normally need the driver’s number.  In the Suva/Nausori area, most drivers will come anywhere you need, and travel freely along the corridor (Kings Road and Princess Road).  You can book a taxi in advance, or call as you need.  It is a good idea to have a few numbers stored as if you are in Nausori at the Suva airport, and the driver is stuck in Suva, you will wait about half an hour or more.

If you know another reputable driver in another area and want to add their details, please respond below.  See also, Getting around Part One – tips, mobile phones, ATMs.

Suva Airport area (Nausori area) reputable licensed taxis

Atish +679 9216093

Soni +679 9212511

Deo +679 9953568

Satea +679 9724312

Saleim (modern 5 seater van with luggage space) +679 9425271

Forum Taxis (very quick service) +679 9337818  /+679 8400402/ +679 7192710 forum.taxis@gmail.com

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Bau Taxis (Vinesh) +679 9953521

Saleim (modern 5 seater van with luggage space) +679 9425271

Ali +679 9667994

Forum Taxis (very quick service) +679 9337818  /+679 8400402/ +679 7192710 forum.taxis@gmail.com

Nadi Airport to Suva City/ Suva City door to door pick up to Nadi Airport

Safe Shuttle Service – modern sedans $25 per person, will pick up and drop off door to door +679 8777047 (Tiko)

Getting around Fiji Part One – Transport tips Nadi to Suva, ATMs, Mobile Phones

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Buses lined up at Suva Bus Stand

If you are planning to travel in Fiji – here are some tips to help you in your travels.  There is so much to tell, so this is Part One.  For additional info see also Part Two with taxi driver numbers and contacts.

IMGP2413Nadi (pronounced Nandi) to Suva by plane

Flying into Fiji is so memorable, and I always love it.  You know when you are approaching Fiji as after flying over open ocean for hours, suddenly you see billowing clouds that go up and up into the heavens.  They seem so solid, and are in layers, one on top of the other.  If you are travelling to Nadi International airport, as you arrive there will be a little troupe of singers to welcome you, and also see you off.  Many tourists do not know what to make of this, but it is really a welcome sight and sound for homecomers to Fiji.  The group normally has a wooden box on a stand for tips/gratuities.  I encourage you to support them as wages here in Fiji are very low, and every dollar counts.IMGP3269

If you are getting a connecting flight, after you go through customs, go out the door and turn right, and walk over to Domestic check in.  Don’t delay, as there is often a long line.  Once you check in, you can go outside for some fresh air, or get a drink or whatever.  If you have been told that your bags will be checked right through to Suva, and you don’t get your bags through customs at International, you will have to run back for them, and risk missing your connection.  I have done this once.

As Nadi International is the first port of call, you must get your bags through customs.  Coming back however, if you check your bags at Suva and then are going through Nadi to your overseas destination, you will not have to collect your bags, they will be sent straight through to your connection.  There are toilets once you get down the escalator at the baggage claim.

IMGP0198Mobile Phones -There is also a vodafone shop as at the airport where you can get your Fiji Vodoafone sim or internet wireless device (dongle/flashnet etc).  Note:  you must have a handset that its unlocked, and not locked to any network as if you try and use an Australian Vodafone prepay phone, it is locked to Vodafone Australia, and the Fijian sim card won’t work!  Otherwise a dual sim phone is handy.

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Elliot, Dom and Roni at Suva/Nausori airport

The overhead lockers in the Nadi to Suva flight are very small, so make sure that your carry on baggage is within the limits for your own sake and the comfort of all.

The trip from Nadi to Suva by plane takes 23 minutes.  Suva airport is not really in Suva, it is in Nausori.

Nadi to Suva by Road : Taxi, Bus, Minibus, Safe Shuttle, Hire Car?

To get from Nausori airport to Suva City, you have to get a taxi, bus or minibus.  Taxi costs around $25FJD.  Make sure that you confirm the fare with the driver first.  If he says he is going to put you on the meter, that is fine, as the meter will show about $25. Sometimes, you can negotiate a bit of a lower rate, depending on the driver and time of day.  If you are on a budget, get a taxi to Nausori Bus stand.  At the bus stand, there are the local buses to Suva (fare $1.60FJD).  Also, there are minibuses just next to the bus stand near the Mobil service station.  You just get on – sometimes they are very crowded, so if you have baggage, you need to pay for the seat for your bags.  Fare to Suva is $1.50FJD.  There are also express coaches such as the Sunbeam, Intercities, and Pacific.  They are comfortable, and you can put your luggage underneath the bus.  The fare to Suva is still only around the $2 mark.  It is not my favourite way to travel though as it gets very hot inside sometimes.  I prefer the buses with the open windows.

The trip to Suva by taxi takes about 25 minutes if there is not too much traffic, by local bus about 45 minutes, and by coach about 30 minutes.

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Local bus

There is also a smaller bus (about a 30 seater) that goes from the Nausori bus stand about every 20 minutes.  Just ask anyone to show you the Princess Road Bus, or as the “Back road Bus”.  This is by far my favourite way to travel to Suva if you get a chance.  Rather than going on Kings Road, it goes the back way through the mountains, past Colo-i-Suva which is in the rainforrest, through Tacirua (pronounced Tathirua) and Tamavua, and then down Edinborough Drive to Suva Bus stand.  The fare is $2 and it takes about the same time as the local bus.  The trip is so beautiful though, and it really gives you a feeling of being in Fiji.

Tips

  • There are some services which operate outside of Nadi Airport.
  • Hire car – I know you can hire a car, but I have never done it, and if you are not experienced on driving the Queens Road Highway, it may be best to think twice, especially in bad weather.
  • Express Bus – the Sunbeam stops outside Nadi Domestic terminal.
  • Taxi – all airport taxis are painted yellow, and the standard fare to town is $15.

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    Licenced Minivan

  • To get to town cheaper, walk outside the airport, and cross over the road.  Wait on the side of the road for a minibus to Nadi.  Just hail any van that has the initials LM for licenced minivan on the numberplate.  The fare is $1.50. Once you get to town if you are going by taxi, ask them to drop you at the minivan stand at the bus stand in Nadi.  If you are going by minibus, they will normally drop you off outside Jacks Department Store.

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    The road from Nausori/Suva airport on the way to Suva

  • It is a 5 minute walk to the bus stand, or minivan stand which is behind the market.  If you are worried about asking where the bus stand is, just ask where the market is, and you will see it.  All of the Fijian people I have met are very keen to help you and show you where to go, often accompanying you.  They love to find out where you are from.  Don’t be put off by this, as your place of origin is very important here in Fiji.  Fijians are very attached to their birthplace, and mothers and fathers villages, so they will often ask two questions: Where are you from (where were you born), and where do you stay (where do you live now away from your birthplace).  For example, Fijians who live in Suva but were not born there will make the distinction that they “stay” in Suva, but are “from” Gau.

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    Suva to Nadi plane

  • The minivan stand is where you can find a “return” taxi to Suva, or a minivan.  The cost of return taxi or minivan to Suva is about $20 to $25 per person.  If you hire a whole taxi, you can travel to Suva in comfort for about $100 negotiated.
  • If you are traveling by minibus, and have luggage, you have to pay for 2 or 3 seats so a taxi is just as cheap.  Minivans are notoriously dangerous, so many Fijians out of concern for you will advise you not to travel that way, even though they do so themselves due to financial constraints.
  • There is also a service called the “Safe Shuttle Service”.  This service takes passengers from Nadi airport to Suva or any place in between.  They have clean, modern cars, and you book in advance.  It is $25 per person, or $100 if you want to hire the whole car.  Returning, they will pick you up from your door.  Best to phone in advance and talk to Tiko phone +679 8777047. Their base is near the sea wall outside the Olympic Pool in Suva.

IMGP0720Tips General once you get settled

  • Taxis are recognisable by the numberplate which starts with LT (for licenced taxi).
  • Minibuses have numberplates that start with LM (licenced minibus).
  • Some taxis do not have the little taxi sign on the top, but if they have the numberplate, they are licenced.
  • To tell where a minibus is going, their route is written on the side of the bus – for example Nausori/Suva/Nausori.
  • You can hail a minibus anywhere along the road, and if it is going in the right direction, it will stop.
  • You pay the minibus driver when you get out of the minibus.

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    Elliot, Dom, Roni at Nausori Bus stand

  • You don’t have to tip taxi drivers, and if you do, they will be very happy if you just round it up to the nearest dollar, and will STILL try and give you back the 10 cents!  Taxi drivers in Fiji are a really nice bunch.  Often students earning extra money, or retirees.  They are a great source of information.
  • Taxi drivers will often try and give you their number – TAKE IT, as there is no central number to call if you want a taxi.  You call the drivers you know and see if they are free.  Also, you can book them in advance for a negotiated fare back to the airport, or if you want to go on a longer trip.
  • All taxis have a little red sticker on the top of their numberplate on the bumper bar.  It says where they are based.  For example, you will see “Suva City”, “Nadi Town”, “Suva Rural” which is near Colo-i-Suva rainforest park and Tamavua, “Nausori Town” etc.  Why does this matter? See next tip…
  • If you see a taxi driver or minibus driver flashing their lights at you while you are waiting at a bus stop or by the side of the road, that means they want to know if you want to get it.  Flashing lights from a taxi often means that they are returning to base and want a return fare.  This is very handy, as if you are on the way from Nausori or another town, heading back to Suva, and you can get a return cab, the fare is between 70 cents and $2 depending on the distance.  You would be safe if you gave $2 for any of these trips.  Make sure before you get in that you ask the driver if he is a “return”.  If he says no, he will put you on the meter.  The meter fare from Nausori to Suva is about $20 to $25.

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    Tom on the bus

  • If you see a minibus flashing their headlights, it means that they have a spare seat if you want it.
  • To hail a bus, minibus or taxi, you put your arm out at about 45 degrees, and make a downward motion with your handIMGP8167
  • If a fellow passenger taps you on the leg, it doesn’t mean that they are keen on you, it means that they want you to ring the bell for them
  • If you have a lot of shopping, you can put it behind the driver on the bus, or on the gearbox cover.
  • If you have vegetables with dirt on them such as a bundle of root crops which you should take if you are visiting someone, you put them under the bus in the open section, and when you get off, tell the driver you are getting your things.  When you have them out of the compartment, slap on the side of the bus to let the driver know that you are OK for him to go.
  • If you hear people making a kissing sound with their lips, it also doesn’t mean that they are keen on you or another passenger.  You often hear it on the minibus.  That is the noise people make to alert the driver that they want him to stop at the next bus stop.  Many ladies simply say loudly “bus stop driver”, but men make the kissing sound.  The kissing sound is also how you can hail a taxi.

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    Suva bus stand

  • If you hear a car beeping its horn behind you as you are walking, it is a taxi driver asking if you need a ride.  They will do this often, as most Fijians do not have cars, and taxis are so cheap, it is a very popular mode of transport especially after shopping.  Normally just a couple of dollars if you are going from the market to home.IMGP6619
  • A quick note on shopping – if you are in Suva or Nausori market, or other large markets, there are wheelbarrow boys.  They will carry your shopping to the bus or taxi stand for you for $1 or $2.

ATMs

There are so many ANZ ATMs in Fiji, and also many Westpac ATMs.  You can get out up to $900 FJD at one time, and the cost at transaction is around $9FJD.  Both my Australian cards work at the ANZ, but only one of them works at Westpac and BSP (Bank of South Pacific).  There are ANZ ATMs at both Nadi and Suva airports, and at many supermarkets.

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