Get our Clean Up published in print – how I did it

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Full page article in the Fiji Sun

I wanted to raise awareness in our small community about the garbage, recycling and environmental issues here in Fiji.  My goal from the start was to get an article in the newspaper.  I didn’t think I’d get a full page with colour photos, but I got lucky.

Here are the steps I took, maybe they will work for you.

First, I looked up the Clean Up the World website just to get some information.  The Clean up the World Weekend this year is in September.  I decided that it was too far away.  As I am originally from Australia, I also knew that Clean Up the World was initiated by Ian Kiernan who started Clean Up Australia so I did some research on that also.   I registered our group for Clean Up the World, and we now have our own member area where we can post information, or people can contact me if they want to be involved.  Member area click here.

In 1989 an ‘average Australian bloke’ had a simple idea to make a difference in his own backyard – Sydney Harbour.

This simple idea has now become the nation’s largest community-based environmental event, Clean Up Australia Day.

It is hard to believe that this campaign began as the inspiration of one man, Australian builder and solo yachtsman, Ian Kiernan.

As an avid sailor, Ian had always dreamed about sailing around the world.

In 1987 his dream came true when he competed in the BOC Challenge solo around-the-world yacht race.

As he sailed through the oceans of the world in his yacht ‘Spirit of Sydney’ he was shocked and disgusted by the pollution and rubbish that he continually encountered in areas such as the Sargasso Sea in the Caribbean.

Having waited years to see the Sargasso’s legendary long golden weeds, Ian’s excited anticipation turned to anger and disappointment when he found them polluted and tangled with rubbish.

The polluted state of the world’s oceans motivated Ian to act.

Once back in Sydney Ian organised a community event with the support of a committee of friends, including Clean Up co founder Kim McKay AO – Clean Up Sydney Harbour.What happened after this is now well documented.

Clean Up Sydney Harbour Day in 1989 received an enormous public response with more than 40,000 Sydneysiders donating their time and energy to clean up the harbour.

Rusted car bodies, plastics of all kinds, glass bottles and cigarette butts were removed by the tonne.

The idea of a clean up day had ignited an enthusiasm and desire among the community to get involved and make a difference to their local environment themselves.

The next year Clean Up Australia Day was born. Ian and his committee believed that if a capital city could be mobilised into action, then so could the whole nation.

Almost 300,000 volunteers turned out on the first Clean Up Australia Day in 1990 and that involvement has steadily increased ever since.

In the past 20 years, Australians have devoted more than 24 million hours towards the environment through Clean Up Australia Day and collected over 200,000 tonnes of rubbish.

The next step for Ian and Kim was to take the concept of Clean Up Australia Day to the rest of the world.

After gaining the support of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Clean Up the World was launched in 1993. Source http://www.cleanupaustraliaday.org.au/about/about-the-event/history

IMGP5651I looked up the Department of Environment website here in Fiji.  Their calendar had no items, but I heard on the radio that as part of World Biodiversity Day, that the Department was coordinating a clean up.  I contacted IMGP5654them by phone, and they let me know that there was no clean up being organised but that groups were free to celebrate biodiversity in any way they pleased, and that if I needed gloves and garbage bags, they could assist.  The did let me know that there was a clean up being organised from June 5 – June 8, and that they could send me the registration form by email.

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I completed the registration form for our area, and sent it in, nominating that I would have 100 volunteers.  From there, as there was no publicity of note, no TV advertisements, nothing in print that I could find, and nothing on their website, I made a flyer.  I decided that we would clean up on Saturday 8th June in Koronivia, near Nausori (home of Suva airport), Fiji.  If you haven’t already read other posts, I live in a rural area, on a long gravel road, with approximately 18,000 residents, and no garbage collection.

I knew that the amount of garbage we would collect would be massive, as I have been in the habit on a Sunday afternoon of doing an informal pick up, and each time, I collect about 75kg at a time.  Because I knew that there would be a lot of garbage, including a lot of recyclables IMGP5755such as plastic drink bottles and aluminium cans, I put in writing and confirmed on the phone to the Department of Environment that I needed a commitment from them that the garbage would be collected on the same day as the clean up, and not be left overnight.

The commitment was given.

With flyer in hand, my husband and I took a day out from work, and went door knocking.  We went to the local Police Post also and asked them to assist with traffic control. The response from the community was so positive that I knew we would make the 100 volunteers.

The next day, on the bus, I started talking to the lady I was sitting next to, and asked her if she was interested in being involved.  She was very enthusiastic, and we exchanged numbers.  Within an hour she phoned me and told me that she would have about 100 volunteers.

IMGP5627My husband contacted his friends at Fiji National University, and told me that they had organised a group of about 40 students.

I knew then that we might get about 250 people turn up, so decided to increase the number to 300 volunteers .

I contacted Department of Environment with our new numbers, and requested 300 pairs of gloves and 600 bags.  I phoned Coca Cola Amatil in Fiji and asked them about recycling.  They have big bags (1,000 kg rice bags) which you can collect from their facility in Suva to fill.  If you bring the recyclables back to them, they pay $1FJD per kg, or 75c per kg if you call and ask them to collect.  I organized that I would collect eight bags from them.  I also IMGP5628spoke to their marketing manager and asked them for some Tshirts or similar as we would be picking up a lot of packaging from Coca Cola and their owned brands.  They said that they have no Tshirts, but they could provide 10 cartons of Coke Zero for the volunteers.  They take all their own brands of plastics, plus Fiji Water, plus all aluminium cans.  I mentioned to them that I would be contacting the two big newspapers here, and would like to mention their support in the media release.

I phoned BSP which is a local Bank here, that promotes themselves as “Go Green”.  I explained what we were doing and they agreed to support us with some wristbands for the kids, stickers, and hundreds of biodegradable shopping bags.  These bags I gave to Shanila, our local shop keeper.  I also told BSP about the proposed contact with the media.

IMGP5624On Friday afternoon before the clean up, I hired a taxi, and went to pick up the gloves and bags from the Department of Environment, plus some Tshirts (only 100 were available), and some bottled water.  As I had to stop by the Coca Cola factory to get the recycling bags, I had to leave some stuff behind, and the Department staff were to drop it off that night.  I arranged with Liti to meet me and she would collect her supplies.  We ended up with double the bags and gloves, making it 1,200 bags due to a mix up, but we used them all!

I emailed the newspapers alerting them to our activity and the number of volunteers, and some background information about our area.

I knew that to get into the paper, we would have to have a massive turn out, and collect a mountain of rubbish.

On the day of the clean up, we went out very early, with me coordinating at one point, my husband at another, and Liti down her end of the street at the Village.  We also had another great coordinator mid way near the Police Post, called Tema.

We had great support also from the local Police football team and the students from Fiji National University Campus that is on our road.

All the volunteers were so positive that during the morning, so many other people came out onto the streets to help.  They helped also by going into feeder roads and yards and assisting others to clean up whatever was there: tin, metal, glass, coconut husks by the sackful, you name it.

During the clean up, I took lots of photographs.IMGP5755

Once the rubbish had been collected, and the truck was due at the pre-arranged time of 11.30am, I phoned my contact from Environment.  I also wanted to let her know about the volume of garbage, as a small truck would have to do many trips. She told me that ‘the truck driver was a Seventh Day Adventist, and would not be coming today’.

Knowing that the community would feel a huge let down at that news, I decided to press on, reminding her that she had given a commitment.  She asked me to call the Minister’s personal staff.  I did just that, and informed him of our problem.  Being a pragmatic person, he quickly organised a solution: two trucks from the nearest Town Council.

The trucks came, me taking photos all the time, the street was clean. The Department of Environment dropped off hot dogs for everyone, and the atmosphere was one of jubilation and pride.

I compiled an email and sent it in to the newspapers after the event, with photos included.

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Capt Niumataiwalu from the Office of the Minister (far left) organised the Town Council trucks to collect the rubbish

One of the editors from the Fiji Sun picked it up and contacted me for some more information.  I sent him a blurb, and it was published the following Thursday.

The community has really come together through this activity, and rubbish and what we are going to do is a hot topic on the street whenever neighbours meet.  There will be another clean up in the next month, leading up to the Clean Up the World Weekend in September.

In the meantime, we have now got recycling bags at every shop along the road, and soon to have recycling at the FNU campus.  I am in touch with other communities about how to get their recycling started, and have been contacting some of the major makers of plastics asking them what other measures they might take to reduce the amount of recyclables that go into the ocean or are IMGP5662burned or buried here in Fiji.  So far, the response from them is less than adequate, but I will continue working on it.  If you have the time to like the facebook page, it really does help spread the message and help this issue gather momentum.  http://www.facebook.com/CleanUpFijiProtectingParadise

Getting around Fiji Part One – Transport tips Nadi to Suva, ATMs, Mobile Phones

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Buses lined up at Suva Bus Stand

If you are planning to travel in Fiji – here are some tips to help you in your travels.  There is so much to tell, so this is Part One.  For additional info see also Part Two with taxi driver numbers and contacts.

IMGP2413Nadi (pronounced Nandi) to Suva by plane

Flying into Fiji is so memorable, and I always love it.  You know when you are approaching Fiji as after flying over open ocean for hours, suddenly you see billowing clouds that go up and up into the heavens.  They seem so solid, and are in layers, one on top of the other.  If you are travelling to Nadi International airport, as you arrive there will be a little troupe of singers to welcome you, and also see you off.  Many tourists do not know what to make of this, but it is really a welcome sight and sound for homecomers to Fiji.  The group normally has a wooden box on a stand for tips/gratuities.  I encourage you to support them as wages here in Fiji are very low, and every dollar counts.IMGP3269

If you are getting a connecting flight, after you go through customs, go out the door and turn right, and walk over to Domestic check in.  Don’t delay, as there is often a long line.  Once you check in, you can go outside for some fresh air, or get a drink or whatever.  If you have been told that your bags will be checked right through to Suva, and you don’t get your bags through customs at International, you will have to run back for them, and risk missing your connection.  I have done this once.

As Nadi International is the first port of call, you must get your bags through customs.  Coming back however, if you check your bags at Suva and then are going through Nadi to your overseas destination, you will not have to collect your bags, they will be sent straight through to your connection.  There are toilets once you get down the escalator at the baggage claim.

IMGP0198Mobile Phones -There is also a vodafone shop as at the airport where you can get your Fiji Vodoafone sim or internet wireless device (dongle/flashnet etc).  Note:  you must have a handset that its unlocked, and not locked to any network as if you try and use an Australian Vodafone prepay phone, it is locked to Vodafone Australia, and the Fijian sim card won’t work!  Otherwise a dual sim phone is handy.

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Elliot, Dom and Roni at Suva/Nausori airport

The overhead lockers in the Nadi to Suva flight are very small, so make sure that your carry on baggage is within the limits for your own sake and the comfort of all.

The trip from Nadi to Suva by plane takes 23 minutes.  Suva airport is not really in Suva, it is in Nausori.

Nadi to Suva by Road : Taxi, Bus, Minibus, Safe Shuttle, Hire Car?

To get from Nausori airport to Suva City, you have to get a taxi, bus or minibus.  Taxi costs around $25FJD.  Make sure that you confirm the fare with the driver first.  If he says he is going to put you on the meter, that is fine, as the meter will show about $25. Sometimes, you can negotiate a bit of a lower rate, depending on the driver and time of day.  If you are on a budget, get a taxi to Nausori Bus stand.  At the bus stand, there are the local buses to Suva (fare $1.60FJD).  Also, there are minibuses just next to the bus stand near the Mobil service station.  You just get on – sometimes they are very crowded, so if you have baggage, you need to pay for the seat for your bags.  Fare to Suva is $1.50FJD.  There are also express coaches such as the Sunbeam, Intercities, and Pacific.  They are comfortable, and you can put your luggage underneath the bus.  The fare to Suva is still only around the $2 mark.  It is not my favourite way to travel though as it gets very hot inside sometimes.  I prefer the buses with the open windows.

The trip to Suva by taxi takes about 25 minutes if there is not too much traffic, by local bus about 45 minutes, and by coach about 30 minutes.

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Local bus

There is also a smaller bus (about a 30 seater) that goes from the Nausori bus stand about every 20 minutes.  Just ask anyone to show you the Princess Road Bus, or as the “Back road Bus”.  This is by far my favourite way to travel to Suva if you get a chance.  Rather than going on Kings Road, it goes the back way through the mountains, past Colo-i-Suva which is in the rainforrest, through Tacirua (pronounced Tathirua) and Tamavua, and then down Edinborough Drive to Suva Bus stand.  The fare is $2 and it takes about the same time as the local bus.  The trip is so beautiful though, and it really gives you a feeling of being in Fiji.

Tips

  • There are some services which operate outside of Nadi Airport.
  • Hire car – I know you can hire a car, but I have never done it, and if you are not experienced on driving the Queens Road Highway, it may be best to think twice, especially in bad weather.
  • Express Bus – the Sunbeam stops outside Nadi Domestic terminal.
  • Taxi – all airport taxis are painted yellow, and the standard fare to town is $15.

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    Licenced Minivan

  • To get to town cheaper, walk outside the airport, and cross over the road.  Wait on the side of the road for a minibus to Nadi.  Just hail any van that has the initials LM for licenced minivan on the numberplate.  The fare is $1.50. Once you get to town if you are going by taxi, ask them to drop you at the minivan stand at the bus stand in Nadi.  If you are going by minibus, they will normally drop you off outside Jacks Department Store.

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    The road from Nausori/Suva airport on the way to Suva

  • It is a 5 minute walk to the bus stand, or minivan stand which is behind the market.  If you are worried about asking where the bus stand is, just ask where the market is, and you will see it.  All of the Fijian people I have met are very keen to help you and show you where to go, often accompanying you.  They love to find out where you are from.  Don’t be put off by this, as your place of origin is very important here in Fiji.  Fijians are very attached to their birthplace, and mothers and fathers villages, so they will often ask two questions: Where are you from (where were you born), and where do you stay (where do you live now away from your birthplace).  For example, Fijians who live in Suva but were not born there will make the distinction that they “stay” in Suva, but are “from” Gau.

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    Suva to Nadi plane

  • The minivan stand is where you can find a “return” taxi to Suva, or a minivan.  The cost of return taxi or minivan to Suva is about $20 to $25 per person.  If you hire a whole taxi, you can travel to Suva in comfort for about $100 negotiated.
  • If you are traveling by minibus, and have luggage, you have to pay for 2 or 3 seats so a taxi is just as cheap.  Minivans are notoriously dangerous, so many Fijians out of concern for you will advise you not to travel that way, even though they do so themselves due to financial constraints.
  • There is also a service called the “Safe Shuttle Service”.  This service takes passengers from Nadi airport to Suva or any place in between.  They have clean, modern cars, and you book in advance.  It is $25 per person, or $100 if you want to hire the whole car.  Returning, they will pick you up from your door.  Best to phone in advance and talk to Tiko phone +679 8777047. Their base is near the sea wall outside the Olympic Pool in Suva.

IMGP0720Tips General once you get settled

  • Taxis are recognisable by the numberplate which starts with LT (for licenced taxi).
  • Minibuses have numberplates that start with LM (licenced minibus).
  • Some taxis do not have the little taxi sign on the top, but if they have the numberplate, they are licenced.
  • To tell where a minibus is going, their route is written on the side of the bus – for example Nausori/Suva/Nausori.
  • You can hail a minibus anywhere along the road, and if it is going in the right direction, it will stop.
  • You pay the minibus driver when you get out of the minibus.

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    Elliot, Dom, Roni at Nausori Bus stand

  • You don’t have to tip taxi drivers, and if you do, they will be very happy if you just round it up to the nearest dollar, and will STILL try and give you back the 10 cents!  Taxi drivers in Fiji are a really nice bunch.  Often students earning extra money, or retirees.  They are a great source of information.
  • Taxi drivers will often try and give you their number – TAKE IT, as there is no central number to call if you want a taxi.  You call the drivers you know and see if they are free.  Also, you can book them in advance for a negotiated fare back to the airport, or if you want to go on a longer trip.
  • All taxis have a little red sticker on the top of their numberplate on the bumper bar.  It says where they are based.  For example, you will see “Suva City”, “Nadi Town”, “Suva Rural” which is near Colo-i-Suva rainforest park and Tamavua, “Nausori Town” etc.  Why does this matter? See next tip…
  • If you see a taxi driver or minibus driver flashing their lights at you while you are waiting at a bus stop or by the side of the road, that means they want to know if you want to get it.  Flashing lights from a taxi often means that they are returning to base and want a return fare.  This is very handy, as if you are on the way from Nausori or another town, heading back to Suva, and you can get a return cab, the fare is between 70 cents and $2 depending on the distance.  You would be safe if you gave $2 for any of these trips.  Make sure before you get in that you ask the driver if he is a “return”.  If he says no, he will put you on the meter.  The meter fare from Nausori to Suva is about $20 to $25.

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    Tom on the bus

  • If you see a minibus flashing their headlights, it means that they have a spare seat if you want it.
  • To hail a bus, minibus or taxi, you put your arm out at about 45 degrees, and make a downward motion with your handIMGP8167
  • If a fellow passenger taps you on the leg, it doesn’t mean that they are keen on you, it means that they want you to ring the bell for them
  • If you have a lot of shopping, you can put it behind the driver on the bus, or on the gearbox cover.
  • If you have vegetables with dirt on them such as a bundle of root crops which you should take if you are visiting someone, you put them under the bus in the open section, and when you get off, tell the driver you are getting your things.  When you have them out of the compartment, slap on the side of the bus to let the driver know that you are OK for him to go.
  • If you hear people making a kissing sound with their lips, it also doesn’t mean that they are keen on you or another passenger.  You often hear it on the minibus.  That is the noise people make to alert the driver that they want him to stop at the next bus stop.  Many ladies simply say loudly “bus stop driver”, but men make the kissing sound.  The kissing sound is also how you can hail a taxi.

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    Suva bus stand

  • If you hear a car beeping its horn behind you as you are walking, it is a taxi driver asking if you need a ride.  They will do this often, as most Fijians do not have cars, and taxis are so cheap, it is a very popular mode of transport especially after shopping.  Normally just a couple of dollars if you are going from the market to home.IMGP6619
  • A quick note on shopping – if you are in Suva or Nausori market, or other large markets, there are wheelbarrow boys.  They will carry your shopping to the bus or taxi stand for you for $1 or $2.

ATMs

There are so many ANZ ATMs in Fiji, and also many Westpac ATMs.  You can get out up to $900 FJD at one time, and the cost at transaction is around $9FJD.  Both my Australian cards work at the ANZ, but only one of them works at Westpac and BSP (Bank of South Pacific).  There are ANZ ATMs at both Nadi and Suva airports, and at many supermarkets.

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