Humble Beginnings – Royal Chickens

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Well, in case anyone has been wondering just how I have been going with my chickens, from the humble beginnings of the plastic bottle chicken house,IMG_0009 I decided to take a photo.  I couldn’t fit all the chickens in one picture, and of course there are now lots of little ones in the house, which don’t come outside yet except as “supervised play” in the afternoons.  The small ones, I have learned with heartache, are the favourite food of the Indian Mongoose which is very crafty, and can catch a chicken and drag it into its burrow at lightning speed.

IMG_0013The white chickens in the photo are cockerels (male chickens).  The started out as very unassuming birds, but now, well to me they look like royalty!  The are so majestic with their manes and their bright red combs.

The red and black chickens are Junglee birds – or native chickens.  They are also changing day by day and will one day be clothed in gold, red, green and black feathers like the old fashioned roosters of yesteryear.  I am planning to win a prize at next year’s agricultural show with one of them!

The plain red chickens are rescued battery hens.  They still lay the odd egg, and they keep the roosters happy.

I wish I had taken a week by week picture so I could show how they grow, but I might do that next time.

Another use for old umbrellas – doggie bed of dreams!

A couple of months ago, our neighbours’ dogs had puppies.  About a week after that, mysteriously, all the girl puppies were dumped in our yard.  They were skinny, ridden with fleas, and starving.  I decided that I had not much choice but to bath them, and care for them until they were old enough for me to find homes for them.  People here in Fiji often dump female puppies as they are not wanted.  There is an SPCA here, and they welcome unwanted animals, but animal welfare in Fiji is very much developing, and is at the lower end of the scale.

Snowy and Patch now have new homes with some lovely families who love animals.  Blackie has stayed with us.  She now has commandeered our umbrella cushion as her doggie bed of dreams.  To see how to make a cushion or dog bed from recycled broken umbrellas, click here.

I wanted to post these pictures to show my cyber friend Jo, who makes all kinds of cool stuff from recycled umbrellas and just sent me a tote bag in the mail.  She has a stall in the UK and an etsy stall.  Her bag is so well made and holds about 25kg of shopping!  I use it daily.  Thanks Jo!  To see her stuff including bicycle paniers, bags, painting smocks, and more, click here.  Maybe soon she will be selling dog beds!

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Blackie, Snowy and Patch a couple of days after they arrived

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Blackie on her bed make of recycled umbrellas

Plastic bottle chicken house – complete!

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Finally, I am posting photos of the completed chicken house!  It has been operational for about a month and a half now, and the chickens are now much bigger than in these pictures.

I can confirm that it is working well, with a feeder made from a recycled kerosene burner, the drinker installed in the wall and also poweraid bottles which are perfect chicken drinkers!  It looks like a stained glass chicken palace now, and is a bit of a local attraction.

I can also confirm that it is definitely mongoose proof, dog proof, pig proof and cat proof!  Ahhh, the sweet smell of success!  Next post on this will be pictures of the rescued battery hens which are now happily laying an egg each a day!  Thanks for the encouragement.

I think that with the sheer weight of bottles and concrete (one 1 litre bottle filled with water weighs 1kg) that it should also be cyclone proof.  Everything in the construction was salvaged except for the chicken wire.  Hooray, about 1000 bottles not on the beach!

To see pics of construction process click here.

Making a chicken house out of plastic bottles – part one

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Chicken house in progress

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Top of completed wall

Recently, as those who know me are aware, I have been busying myself making a chicken house using hundreds of plastic bottles collected from the neighbourhood.

  • Step one – collect bottles
  • Step two – fill with food colouring and water and screw lids on tightly
  • Step three – dig a shallow trench about half the depth of a bottle lying down to anchor the wall

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    Plastic bottle wall in progress

  • Step four – fill the trench with bottles about half a bottle width apart
  • Step  five – mix concrete (about one 40kg bag of cement to five 25kg bags of sand)
  • Step six – put concrete between the bottom layer of bottles and start stacking the bottles on top, row by row
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    Step one: dig a trench and fill with bottles

  • Steps seven to infinity – stay tuned – I have grand plans!   We will see whether they eventuate, but my grand design should incorporate the following:

  • I have already poked holes in several bottles to make some ventilation and drainage for the lower wall
  • I am going to insert some 30 Litre yellow plastic cooking oil drums into the wall with an opening on the outside for filling and catching rain water, and an opening on the inside for the chickens to drink from
  • I am going to use guttering and a vertical stack of linked 30 litre plastic drums to collect rain water and auto fill the drinkers
  • I have collected dumped kerosine stoves to use as the roof ventilation vents
  • I have already made a prototype of a roof whirlybird ventilator out of a 2 litre coke bottle
  • I have already planted pawpaw seeds outside the sunniest wall
  • I am going to insert wooden fruit boxes into the wall as nesting boxes, with hatches for egg collecting on the outside
  • I may even insert a fresh water pond inside for growing small fish and for the chickens to drink from
  • the whole thing has to be mongoose proof!

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    One wall completed

Also, since I saw the flip flop art, it occurred to me that I could even partly shingle the roof with flipflops for insulation from the heat, but I am not sure… otherwise since I saw the angel wing flip flop art, perhaps I will breed artistic chooks, and install an art piece inside for their viewing pleasure.

It reminds me a little of one of my favourite books to read to the kids when they were little.  It was called “The Hilton Hen House”.

The construction is coming along so nicely that the teenagers are asking whether we can scrap the chickens and they can move into it as a teenage hangout.  I think that it will be really lovely actually, and am determined to sleep in there one night before we put the chickens in.

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Filling the bottles with water and food colouring

I know they make this kind of construction elsewhere in the world and make houses, schools and other structures, but I never realized it would be so easy (and fun).  If people here in Fiji who live in settlements (slums) had access to the money for concrete, the bottles are free.

Even the timber and iron has been salvaged and saved from landfill.

Perhaps I will write a grant proposal after this is finished.  A great video on the squatter settlement conditions is online at http://www.smh.com.au/multimedia/world/fijis-squatter-settlements-20091127-jwda.html

Flipflop Angel Wings – a recycling masterpiece!

fllipflop

Source:www.recyclart.org

I just posted this to the facebook page, but couldn’t contain myself.  So many flipflops discarded, or missing a pair.  Fiji must be the flipflop hub of the world I think.  Flipflops are the only thing to wear in the wet season: to church, to work, to town.  Fiji is a “no shoes inside” place, where you have to take off your shoes before entering any home, meeting place, or church.  Flip flops are the only solution, and like odd socks, they always seem to have one go AWOL.  However, unlike socks, there is never a bag of them hanging on the back of the laundry door, they are just left – here, there, everywhere – clogging up drains and washing up lonely on beaches.

More photos at http://www.recyclart.org/2014/02/flipflops-angels-wings/

One couple put them to good use in this amazing art work.  I am running out of daylight hours!

Another item that seems to be discarded after every use is the metal mosquito coil holder – I have some ideas and would love to see if anyone else has made some artwork from them.

Recycled umbrella tote bags, bicycle paniers, and more….

umbrella bag

Photo source: http://www.etsy.com

People are so smart!  A while ago, I got a comment from a reader in the UK who upcycles umbrellas into tote bags and sells them through her etsy shop.  She also uses the umbrellas to make bicycle paniers, painting smocks, bunting and more.  She tells me that one rainy weekend, she collected over  60 discarded umbrellas!

I thought that it was worth posting a link for any readers who are interested in placing an order at http://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/176803426/upcycled-umbrella-tote-bag?ref=shop_home_active_1

The maker is the lovely Jo Bodley, and she has a written “how to” on her blog http://carminabiryani.blogspot.com/

Jo contacted me after seeing my attempt at making bean bags out of broken umbrellas.

Thanks so much Jo!  In the UK, you seem to have some beautiful umbrella fabrics!  In Fiji, the choice of trash to treasure is more limited.  I am going to give the tote bags a try, after I finish making my chicken house out of plastic bottle bricks filled with coloured water.

How to make a herb garden on wheels from recycled pallets

herb

Source:byronobserver.com

My friend Robyn who lives in Byron Bay but has close ties to Moturiki Island, Fiji,  posted this great herb garden on wheels from recycled pallets.  Thanks Robyn!

Also, it appears that if you get your hands dirty, you feel happier – who knew!  But, I must admit whenever the stress of life gets to me I take refuge in the garden, and the reward is that I haven’t had to buy fruit or vegetables for months now and I haven’t even bought any seeds, I just throw the bags of waste from the market vendors on the ground and see what germinates.

boyle

We eat: corn, tomatoes, ochra, pumpkin, sweet potato leaf, pumpkin leaf, beans, long beans, chilli, paw paw, bele, roro (taro leaf), soursop, banana, cucumber, dahnia, bitter gourd, eggplant, dalo, cassava, and the list goes on!

Often people go hungry here, and the papers are full of what they call “Food Security” which means that they are trying to get to a point where all the food needed for Fiji can be grown or farmed in Fiji.  However, every weekend I go to the very small market in Nakasi, and I bring home a van full of bags of “waste” from the market. This waste is called “rubbish” but it is mostly good food, and what isn’t good for cooking, I use on the garden and the seeds grow!

Normally this waste is not even separated, but just sent to landfill with all the millions of plastic bottles, cans and other stuff that is still perceived as waste here.

To see step by step how to make the herb garden on wheels check out Robyn’s post at http://byronobserver.com/2013/11/26/getting-down-and-dirty/

It also reminded me of this photo I saw today.

 

How to make a bean bag cushion chair from recycled umbrellas

             IMGP2363 Recycled umbrella bean bag cushions

From this

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Two umbrellas dumped on the ground

To this!

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using a cardboard stencil

Ever wondered what to do with broken umbrellas?  In Fiji, after any downpour of rain, along the roadside, you will see literally hundreds of broken umbrellas – ahh, they don’t make them like they used to.  By the way, one thing I discovered when I was doing this project was why my grandma always told me to buy a good quality umbrella regardless of the cost.  I have often wondered why umbrellas these days seem so flimsy and turn inside out the the slightest gust of wind.  Is it because they are so cheap, and poorly made?  Not really.  When you have to take one apart, you see the enormous amount of effort that has gone into making one.  The IMGP2359umbrella skin is hand stitched very well to the spokes at several places on each spoke, and then hammered into the top of the handle using a metal clamp.  However, when looking at the fabric of two umbrellas that seem an equal size, and then sewing them together, I noticed that not all the triangular panels are exactly the same size, even though they look it when the umbrella is up.  Actually with the cheap umbrellas, the fabric

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triangles are all quite different sizes.  This must create a tension issue when the umbrella skin is stitched to the spokes, and therefore create instability when the wind catches the umbrella.  If I were a scientist, I would do an experiment to see if the part that flies up in the wind, is the section with the biggest piece of triangle fabric compared to the others, and therefore with the lowest tension.  Sadly, or maybe a good thing for the world, I am not a scientist.

Now to the real business of this post.  Seeing so very many broken umbrellas (actually only the frames break usually, and the fabric is intact) by the side of the road after a bit of rainy weather, and needing some more furniture, I decided to see what I could do.

I took a small stitch unpicker (or scissors would do) with me and walked to the bus stop.  On the way I found two or three umbrellas in the gutter, and unpicked the fabric from the frame which took about 20 seconds each time.  I stuffed the fabric in my bag and felt bad that I left the frames where I found them.  I then got the bus 5 minutes down the road to my local market place, and got off.  I collected another 10 umbrellas there, and did the same thing, and went home.

I have since felt so guilty about leaving the frames on the road side that I take them home and use them for trellises for the long beans and cucumber plants.

People thought I was very strange and asked me what I was doing, but now, taxi drivers who have taken me home and seen the cushions I made bring me umbrellas each week when they find them on the road side!

IMGP2365I soaked the umbrella skins in a bit of bleach for a while, washed them and hung them out to dry.  The rest was easy!

Check the umbrella skins for any small breaks in the stitching, sew up the top part where it joined the top of the handle (there will be a small hole in the middle of each umbrella circle).

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Dom spray painting

IMGP2356You can spray paint a stencil pattern if you like.

Sew two umbrellas of the same size together inside out and leave a small opening to insert the filling.

Fill with foam chips or polystyrene balls, or even used and clean plastic bags and old clothes.

Sew up the hole.

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Jone and Samu

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Ellena and Kim

Sit down!

Read the paper,

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Renee having a hard earned rest

watch TV,

relax!

How to make the best ever footstool or chair from recycled paint cans

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Finished chair – dining height

This is the first of four stools that I made more than 2 months ago.  They are in daily use as dining chairs and general chairs, rather than footstools, as we don’t have a couch on which to sit on so that we can use them as footstools – never mind!  They really get used heavily with three teenagers in the house, plus their cousins and friends, not to mention the adults, and they are very durable and comfortable.  They are made from all recycled materials except for the foam and the sticky tape.  I could have replaced the foam with recycled clean plastic bags, or even newspaper, and next time I will try and do that.  I did this because

1. we really needed some furniture, and

2. I want to challenge perceptions of what is actually “rubbish”.

There are so many things that we discard and the moment they are discarded they are then perceived as “rubbish” or “trash” and no longer of use, however, I have found that many of these things actually have a long lasting second use.  I know that this is not news to readers, but I am not sure whether anyone else has tried this with paint cans.  As it would take maybe hundreds of years for these things to break down fully if in landfill, perhaps I have invented the longest lasting chair EVER!  Who knows! I got the idea from a similar thing I saw with plastic bottles which I have linked here. Perhaps the same thing could be done with used large food cans such as tomato sauce cans here in Fiji, or the large pineapple juice or coffee cans.

Anyway, now for the instructions…

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First, bang the lids onto the cans securely.  Then arrange four cans into a square.

Tape the four cans together securely with packing tape.  Make another set of four cans so that you are using eight in total.

Cut four pieces of used cardboard or coreflute (your could also use plywood) to the size of the cans.  Put one piece on the top and bottom of each set of four cans.  Tape securely with packing tape.  Tape the two sets together securely.

Make a cushion for the top out of a used plastic bag filled with foam chips.  You could also try replacing the foam chips with clean IMGP2366used plastic bags.  Tape the opening of the plastic bag, and poke some small holes into it so that air escapes easily when you sit on it.  Otherwise it might burst.

Cut a piece of thin foam (or used recycled materials) to cover the cushion, making sure that the cushion IMGP2367is centred nicely.  Secure the foam with rafia or string, and gently pull the foam down working around so that you do not have any folds and it is nice and tight.  Once you have that right, then use packing tape over the rafia and secure it in place.

Cut another piece of foam that is going to go around the outside, including overlap under the bottom slightly.  Wrap it around, pull tight, and secure with rafia and tape. No need to stitch anything at this stage.

To cover the chair, I used an old sulu or sarong.

IMGP3460Cut a piece of material to cover the cushion area.  Secure with rafia, pull down and smooth any folds.  Secure with tape.IMGP3461

Cut a piece of material to cover the outside.  Then turn this outside piece inside out over the top so that you are going to have the rafia and string on the inside.  Effectively it is inside out.  Secure with rafia and tape.

Note: Make sure that you have folded the overlap so that when you turn the fabric “right side out” the fold will be hidden underneath your final chair.

Once it is secure, then use a curved needle with very strong thread (I used the thread that is IMGP3468IMGP3472readily available here in Fiji which the shoe makers use, but you could use upholstery thread) to stitch around where the cushion joins the base of the chair.  Stitch actually over the rafia that

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IMGP3488you have tied on the inside out base fabric so that the whole structure is secure.  Once you have stitched all the way around, turn the base fabric back down to cover the base, and fold underneath the base of the chair.

Fold the fabric underneath neatly, as if wrapping a present.  Make sure you get out all the folds around the base of the chair.  Pin securely and stitch the “present wrapping” together underneath the chair.  To make the little chair legs to keep the fabric off the ground, I simply used four recycled plastic drink bottle lids and screwed them into the base with a screwdriver.  I was not sure whether the screws would hold into the pain tins, but they really do.

Stay tuned for the next post – how to make a bean bag out of old umbrellas!

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Dom and Finn playing cards with another version of the chair in the background.

Machine that turns plastics to oil

oil

Source:youtube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPIHJRIpLRk

A friend sent me this link about a man in Japan who has made a simple machine which converts plastics back to oil, or kerosene (many Fijians use kerosene for cooking).  Since then I have seen a whole lot of back yard versions on youtube.

Fold up shipping container home – another solution

portabatch

Source:dornob.com

http://dornob.com/port-a-bach-modular-push-button-cargo-container-home/#axzz2dIixHHG4

This great idea would be perfect here in Fiji!  Solar panel, composting toilet, and folds down to handle extreme weather.

So many un-used shipping containers here.  Mountains of them sitting around in “container parks” for sale.  Each one costs about $5000 FJD (about $2500 USD) yet the habit here is to build corrugated iron homes for more than ten times the cost which are not cyclone resistant, let alone flood tolerant.

If these homes were also on wheels, they could be moved to higher ground in the event of cyclones and floods, often caused by tidal surges, or even the rising water of the ocean due to climate change which is as we speak, causing villages to relocate to higher ground.

Calling film makers and artists – want to make a documentary in Fiji about art from ocean trash?

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Fiji’s oldest Hotel, the Royal Hotel, Levuka

Tonight I couldn’t sleep and I came across this short National Geographic film about a group of artists and ocean debris specialists (weird that we now have a profession listed as that!) who traveled to remote beaches in Alaska, collected tonnes of ocean debris that washes up there, and are making art from it.  The exhibition will tour the world and opens in 2014 in Anchorage.

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Some of the ocean debris in Levuka, including a washing machine

I know some of my readers are artists, photographers, great writers, activists, yachtspeople, and travellers.  It would be great to make a similar documentary in Fiji, maybe starting with Levuka, the old capital of Fiji which is remote, almost forgotten, and the landing place of an amazing amount of debris.  Is anyone interested.  Perhaps people could send in clips from each part of Fiji and we could compile?

Sorry I posted the link on facebook before felt compelled to write this post, so apologies if you get this twice!  To view the film: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/08/21/filmmakers-document-the-weirdness-of-marine-garbage/#comment-281943

 

How to make a thatched roof from PET bottles

plastic thatch

Plastic thatch from PET bottles
Source: http://www.inhabitat.com

Here’s an idea!  So many bottles dumped in Fiji every year and thatching is also now hard to come by as the land is cleared and unsustainable farming practice leaves little room for growing traditional building materials.

Thatch can be made from plastic bottles cut into long strips – this man has made a machine, but it is really quick to do it by hand.  My son loves doing it just for fun when I am trying to make other useful stuff from the bottles – he does one in about a minute.

Perfect for tropical climates.

http://inhabitat.com/hand-powered-machine-can-make-thatch-roofs-from-plastic-bottles-in-tropical-climates/

How to make an Outdoor Pizza Oven using recycled stuff

Courtesy of Classic Marine Iguana – this is a great instruction manual including pics of how to make your own pizza oven using stuff which you can find either in your own back yard, or lying around.  I know that if I want to make one of these here in Fiji (which I do!) if I keep my eye out, now that I have the “shopping” list of free stuff to source, I will find it all in about 10 days and bring it home bit by bit from the side of the road.

No electricity, no kerosene, no gas!  Perfect for rural and island communities, villages and settlements!

http://classicmarineiguana.wordpress.com/2013/07/28/100-pizza-oven/

Everyone gets overwhelmed by ocean plastic

I was looking around for another video to watch to further my education into nurdles and other things I previously knew nothing about like photodegrading versus biodegrading and why I can no longer sleep.  Ironically, I was looking for a video on plastics to try and put me to sleep for an hour or so….  I was at the same time emailing a good friend about her hugely private life, and that I am feeling overwhelmed.  All the things I used to think are now seen in a different light, and it is making me tired.  My brain needs a rest…I feel I can’t function until I come to a resolution as to what exactly I am going to do.  I realize that it is really overwhelming and that I can’t solve the problem, or even a satisfactory portion of it.  So many smart people already working on it.  Some of them have been working on it for years, but then when you watch the youtube video you see that it might have only 500 hits!  How, I started to wonder?  Don’t their own friends even care, let alone their students, colleagues, or the media?

Since I started thinking about HOW to solve a problem that exists here in Fiji, of rubbish, rubbish everywhere, I decided to first gain a better understanding of WHAT the problem really is…. Is it consumers, is it multinationals, is it tourists, is it laws or their absence or flouting, is it plastic itself that is the problem, is it our seduction by it and dependency on it.  What did people do in the 60’s without so much of it.  I don’t know, I was a kid!  I remember some things, through the eyes of a 5 year old – so I am not sure that I should base any academic assumptions on those memories or perceptions!

I want to find out so much because I now (knowing a bit more) feel a HUGE responsibility to make sure that the strategy I put in place is going to be effective, not let people down, not harm the environment more. I want to put something in place that works and is effective.  I also realise that all this research must have affected my brain as I have the urge to hit “CAPS LOCK” all too often.  Like a child’s drawing where mummy has huge hands, I want to magnify what is obviously most important in my brain.

Long story short – there is now a bottle made from recovered and recycled Ocean Plastic.  It is by a company called Method.  http://methodhome.com/ocean-plastic/

On the site there are also some videos that show how the ocean plastic is collected, what is ocean plastic, why is it bad etc.  That might be good for me to show my family so that they understand what has gotten into me lately and why I can’t just relax and enjoy living in a tropical island paradise!

I was reading an interview with one of the founders of Method, Adam Lowry,  and he says the following (I think I am up to the overwhelmed stage) which is helpful.  Whatever strategy I decide on over the next week or so must be one that doesn’t focus on sacrifice…

….He says, “everyone gets overwhelmed by ocean plastic”, which is comforting, as after watching Plasticized, Plastic Oceans, the 5 Gyres, birds falling out of the sky on Lord Howe Island (or at least dying from ingesting plastic that they thought was fish), the Greenpeace ad where birds did fall out of the sky, etc, I am officially overwhelmed….

At the bottom of the page they also have some ocean facts that are easy to understand.  Anyway, Adam Lowry says:

Recycled packaging isn’t a very compelling story for consumers, though, which is why I started thinking about ocean plastic. Everyone who learns about this issue gets overwhelmed by it: these tiny bits of micro-plastic that gather in huge islands and get swallowed by birds and fish, then enter our food chain… What if we could take some of it out of the ocean and put it on the shelves of a national retailer? That would make a good come-back to any excuses: if Method can turn something that’s been floating in the ocean for a decade into a useable bottle, then PCR packaging isn’t impossible. So, in many ways, when we made a bottle out of ocean plastic, it was a device to get the conversation started. – See more at: http://www.forumforthefuture.org/greenfutures/articles/adam-lowry-can-we-put-ocean-plastic-shelves#sthash.DDoT6RHg.dpuf

Source: http://www.forumforthefuture.org/greenfutures/articles/adam-lowry-can-we-put-ocean-plastic-shelves

PCR packaging is impossible, they said

Packaging is crying out for radical change. When it comes to plastic, there are billions of tonnes of it already in circulation, but other brands reject post-consumer waste as a material. For one thing, the consumer doesn’t care enough about it, and it’s also hard to source. Coca-Cola used to have the world’s largest plastics recycling plant in South Carolina, but they shut it down and turned instead to virgin plastic from sugar cane. When we set out to design a bottle from 100% post-consumer recycled material (PCR), we were told it was impossible – especially if we wanted clear, high quality bottles in vibrant colours. True, when we first started looking into it, we could only get brown, dingy ones. We had to go right back to the plastics curbside collection systems and push for the contaminants turning it brown to be removed, and then help refine the recycling process, to get the right grade of resin to make bottles that are 100% PCR, and yet as clear as the virgin plastic ones.

Everyone gets overwhelmed by ocean waste

Recycled packaging isn’t a very compelling story for consumers, though, which is why I started thinking about ocean plastic. Everyone who learns about this issue gets overwhelmed by it: these tiny bits of micro-plastic that gather in huge islands and get swallowed by birds and fish, then enter our food chain… What if we could take some of it out of the ocean and put it on the shelves of a national retailer? That would make a good come-back to any excuses: if Method can turn something that’s been floating in the ocean for a decade into a useable bottle, then PCR packaging isn’t impossible. So, in many ways, when we made a bottle out of ocean plastic, it was a device to get the conversation started. We don’t plan to make every bottle from it: that would not be the most sustainable thing to do.

– See more at: http://www.forumforthefuture.org/greenfutures/articles/adam-lowry-can-we-put-ocean-plastic-shelves#sthash.DDoT6RHg.dpuf

PCR packaging is impossible, they said

Packaging is crying out for radical change. When it comes to plastic, there are billions of tonnes of it already in circulation, but other brands reject post-consumer waste as a material. For one thing, the consumer doesn’t care enough about it, and it’s also hard to source. Coca-Cola used to have the world’s largest plastics recycling plant in South Carolina, but they shut it down and turned instead to virgin plastic from sugar cane. When we set out to design a bottle from 100% post-consumer recycled material (PCR), we were told it was impossible – especially if we wanted clear, high quality bottles in vibrant colours. True, when we first started looking into it, we could only get brown, dingy ones. We had to go right back to the plastics curbside collection systems and push for the contaminants turning it brown to be removed, and then help refine the recycling process, to get the right grade of resin to make bottles that are 100% PCR, and yet as clear as the virgin plastic ones.

Everyone gets overwhelmed by ocean waste

Recycled packaging isn’t a very compelling story for consumers, though, which is why I started thinking about ocean plastic. Everyone who learns about this issue gets overwhelmed by it: these tiny bits of micro-plastic that gather in huge islands and get swallowed by birds and fish, then enter our food chain… What if we could take some of it out of the ocean and put it on the shelves of a national retailer? That would make a good come-back to any excuses: if Method can turn something that’s been floating in the ocean for a decade into a useable bottle, then PCR packaging isn’t impossible. So, in many ways, when we made a bottle out of ocean plastic, it was a device to get the conversation started. We don’t plan to make every bottle from it: that would not be the most sustainable thing to do.

– See more at: http://www.forumforthefuture.org/greenfutures/articles/adam-lowry-can-we-put-ocean-plastic-shelves#sthash.DDoT6RHg.dpuf

Everyone gets overwhelmed by ocean waste

Recycled packaging isn’t a very compelling story for consumers, though, which is why I started thinking about ocean plastic. Everyone who learns about this issue gets overwhelmed by it: these tiny bits of micro-plastic that gather in huge islands and get swallowed by birds and fish, then enter our food chain… What if we could take some of it out of the ocean and put it on the shelves of a national retailer? That would make a good come-back to any excuses: if Method can turn something that’s been floating in the ocean for a decade into a useable bottle, then PCR packaging isn’t impossible. So, in many ways, when we made a bottle out of ocean plastic, it was a device to get the conversation started. We don’t plan to make every bottle from it: that would not be the most sustainable thing to do.

– See more at: http://www.forumforthefuture.org/greenfutures/articles/adam-lowry-can-we-put-ocean-plastic-shelves#sthash.DDoT6RHg.dpuf

Recycled packaging isn’t a very compelling story for consumers, though, which is why I started thinking about ocean plastic. Everyone who learns about this issue gets overwhelmed by it: these tiny bits of micro-plastic that gather in huge islands and get swallowed by birds and fish, then enter our food chain… What if we could take some of it out of the ocean and put it on the shelves of a national retailer? That would make a good come-back to any excuses: if Method can turn something that’s been floating in the ocean for a decade into a useable bottle, then PCR packaging isn’t impossible. So, in many ways, when we made a bottle out of ocean plastic, it was a device to get the conversation started. – See more at: http://www.forumforthefuture.org/greenfutures/articles/adam-lowry-can-we-put-ocean-plastic-shelves#sthash.DDoT6RHg.dpuf

Plasticized – from sushi fish to fish sushi

001.jpgI have often found myself wondering lately why and how my obsession with plastics, rubbish, recycling and the environment has grown since I have been in Fiji from a shaking of my head whilst on the bus, to a commitment to go alone collecting plastic bottles in the rain on Sunday afternoons at home to organising community clean ups to starting to write about it constantly, starting a facebook page CleanupFiji dedicated to it, thinking about it, dreaming about it.  Even my concept of what is plastic, what is rubbish, what is recycling, or recylable has changed.

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My husband on the beach at Namoimada, near Rakiraki, Fiji

Every day as the concept becomes clearer in my mind, it also becomes clear to me that the more I find out the less I really know.  My concept of how multinationals, plus individuals such as you and I not just contribute but CREATE the problem is morphing.  I used to think, what harm can it really do if I get my soy sauce in the little plastic sushi fish container that they give with every pack of sushi lunch?  I know that most people don’t recycle them, but maybe someday things will change.  I once asked last year at my local work place cafe how many sushi fish plastic soy sauce bottles they might use in a day.  The lady quickly told me that in one day, that small cafe would use about 8 big bags, which would be about 8,000 of them.  I started seeing them everywhere I looked.  Tip: with solid waste, the tip is to look DOWN a lot of the time.  Still, I didn’t do anything.  I started joking with my teenage and adult sons about making a little comic cartoon for youtube with the sushi fish that found its way to the plastic garbage island – maybe that would raise awareness.  I never did anything.  I always talked to my friends about how great it would be to go back to the days we remembered as kids where there were no supermarkets, and every corner had a local shop, a local butcher.  No need for mum to have a car, as we all walked to the shops on errands and brought our stuff back in paper bags or cold things wrapped in newspaper.  I never did anything.  I still used to 95% of the time drive my car to the local supermarket which was less than 500 meters away from my house.

I now live that kind of life here in Fiji in a way, where I have no car, I have to walk to the local shop, butter is still wrapped in paper, and on every corner there is someone selling fruit, vegetables or eggs, what went wrong?  Why is the picture I had in my mind about going back to community style life, and the real picture so jarringly wrong.  What has made me unsettled?  I have come to the conclusion that is is the plastic, plastic everywhere.  It doesn’t fit with the naive picture I had in my mind’s eye.

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One of my favourite photos, backflip, Levuka, Fiji

Not that I came to Fiji for a sea change.  I married a Fijian so this is where we moved to.  But, I have realised that the picture I had in my head of the type of life where people still know each other’s names and life is less focused on consumerism is a memory – a real memory – of what life was like when I was growing up in Brisbane.  There was very little plastic then.  The chemist still mixed the medicine in the apothecary, and put it into glass bottles and jars, the jams, drinks and all manner of other preserved foods still were in jars that you could re-use or return for a coin.  The cheeses, meats and small goods were still sold out of a display fridge at the local grocer, and wrapped in paper for you to take home.  Instead of everyone needing a car, if you had a big shop, the local grocer (who happened to be my dad) would deliver it to your house.  He was the only one who needed a car or van in the neighbourhood!  In fact, I went with dad as his “off-sider” so often and heard him call out “Rocer” as he approached the front door of our customers’ homes with a cardboard box with the order in it balanced on his shoulder that I thought his name was Rocer.  Actually, he was calling out “Grocer”, but never mind.  I can still see him in my mind’s eye as he did the rounds, me in tow.  He is even now a small but very strong man, with always a twinkle in his eye and a little joke for the ladies.  Life then was geared around walking.  The school rule was that if it was pouring with rain in the wet season, children were not to wear their shoes or sandals whilst walking to school as they would be ruined and would not last.  I remember feeling a real sense of sadness when my own kids were growing up and were in grade 1 and 2, that their school announced that all children must wear shoes at all times at school, even in the playground as otherwise they might get cut with broken glass.  A loss of innocence.

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Rubbish that will find its way to the sea, Fiji

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Old and new co-exist in Suva Harbour

Now, finally, being confronted with a beautiful community life, in a beautiful paradise – Fiji – I am finally motivated to do something.  Why, because the results of my previous life where I thought it didn’t matter if we bought things in plastic bottles and bags as long as we did the “right thing” with them, are here to haunt me.  Doing the “right thing” is relatively easy in a developed nation.  It is not easy or accessible here in a developing nation.  It is hard!  It is made hard!  Big plastic producers do not want to make it easy, why would they?  They have no need to worry as the world is full of picture postcard images of developing nations as beaches, coconut trees and smiling faces.  Yes, there are beaches, coconut trees, smiling faces, communities.  Yes, it is paradise.  Yes, I am very fortunate that I met and married my husband.  But, in this paradise, the excesses of the West, without the inbuilt controls are frighteningly real.  The perceived need for products and in particular products wrapped or bottled in plastic, is rampant.  The mechanism for getting rid of the plastics, close to non-existent, and a secret closely guarded and defended by two of the major players, Coca Cola Amatil Fiji, and Fiji Water.

I just spent a little while watching the feature length documentary called Plasticized.  If you have the time, it is worth a watch.  It is not hard going, but more an independent film about an ocean research journey on a yacht, with a little bag that trawls for nurdles.  One big take away from the film that I got which is timely – even plastic which is touted or promoted as “biodegradable” will only biodegrade in a properly managed land fill (which do not exist much in the developing world).  It will not biodegrade once it

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Lovers watch as a fridge bobs romantically in Suva Harbour

reaches the ocean, it will “photodegrade”.  This means that the sunlight will start to break the plastic down into smaller and smaller pieces until it is the size of plankton (and probably smaller).  From the most minute organism, to the filter feeding whales, this is their diet.  Plastic particles now outstrip plankton in the oceans by 6:1, they say.  Additionally, chemicals from industrial waste, oils and the like actually attach themselves to the plastic nurdles, which act as a sponge.  The jelly fish, crabs, fish and other marine animals ingest the plastic with their food, and with it the chemicals.  The effect of the chemicals and plastics biomagnifies up the food chain, until we eat it.  To view the film click here.

Next, I will announce the cartoon youtube challenge to make a video about a sushi fish who found his way to the plastic islands in the oceans…. stay tuned.  Actually, the sushi fish (soy sauce bottle), once reaching the ocean, will eventually photodegrade and become part of your sushi fish (lunch).

The film maker joined the crew on the small boat and sailed, collecting data all the way to, and into the great pacific garbage patch.  He did not get the chance, as he wished, to swim through bobbing waves of intact plastic bottles and computer screens, even though some of those were still intact. More that the ocean is actually a thick soup of suspended plastic.

In the film, one person commented, “To make something that is meant to be used for a minute, but lasts for a lifetime, is actually evil”.  It made me think about how many times I just used things for a minute, and then had to dispose of them.  Even here, I still do, but a lot less than I used to, as here in Fiji, I have to actually THINK, how I am going to dispose of it.  It doesn’t automatically happen like it seemed to back home.  I have to actually engage in the process.

Seaweed House – what an idea!

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Our old house in Koronivia, made of corrugated iron.

Here’s a thought!  Amazing what you stumble upon – apparently seaweed houses have been a traditional method of construction on some island communities.  A modern take on it is on Dornob.  Click here for more information.  Pictures of the seaweed house at the bottom of this post.

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Typical house in Savusavu, Fiji

Informal settlement in Fiji. Muanivatu, Central Suva.
Source: http://www.informalism.net

So many ideas for building in Fiji where timber is expensive.  Funnily enough though, mahogany or mangrove wood is used for firewood here, and the sawdust from the mahogany is sold for $2 FJD per bag to use in chicken houses or on the garden.  Banana crates are made from mahogany, but most Fijian homes are made of either concrete or corrugated iron.  So many of the homes even in coastal villages are corrugated iron loosely cobbled together.  So many (between 100,000 and 300,000) people in Fiji live in informal settlements or shanty towns. http://www.informalism.net/2010/04/asian-coaltion-for-housing-rights-in.html

Seaweed is apparently fire resistant and insulating, and also readily available in Fiji.

Modern Seaweed House 2

Source: Dornob

How to make a solar garden flower light from recycled PET bottles – take two

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Solar flower light emits a soft glow through the PET flowers at night

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Pretty and chirpy during the day in the sun

Well, so many people have been searching my site for the real “how to” instructions for making a flower out of PET bottles, and my last post didn’t really do full justice to the process, so I have made amends below.  This is attempt number two.  For attempt number one (fluro light cover) see here.

Attempt number two is a solar flower light that I have hanging in the garden.IMGP7675

Wash PET bottles

Cut in half with stanley knife – I found it easy to just make a small cut with the knife then cut the rest with scissors

IMGP7625Cut both the tops and the bottom halves into strips with scissors

Fold the petals back and kind of crunch them up so that they look like IMGP7630flowers

keep any small snipped out bits for the centre of the flowers

spray paint everything in a few coloursIMGP7619

IMGP7622poke a couple of holes in the bottom of each of your new flowers to thread wire through

poke holes in the centre bits also – I used a soldering iron for thisIMGP7621

IMGP7672thread wire through the flowers, attaching a centre bit or stamen as needed

use the wire to attach to an old piece of chicken wire or fly screen

IMGP7628once you have all the flowers attached to the fly screen, make into  circle and secureIMGP7669

then use wire and hang some flowers artistically from the bottom

use curtain ring to make a hanger for the light

I used a small solar bulb made by Nokero (short for No Kerosene) and used another curtain ring to hang it inside the middle of the light

If I had access to solar fairy lights here in Fiji, that would be my first preference.IMGP7679

it really looks beautiful at night, and because I used bright colours, it is also pretty during the day

it took me a morning to figure it out but I am glad I did it.  It is one small step to making some use of the bottles that are everywhere here in Fiji, and IMGP7683a small step to getting them out of the environment!  The thing is, PET bottles can be recycled, but you have to actually send them to recycling for that to work.

As Mother Teresa once said, “to keep a lamp burning, you have to put oil in it”

IMGP7666IMGP7667TIP FOR NEW PLAYERS:  I did think it would look pretty with some fairy lights hanging in it, but even though the fairy lights have the wires insulated, when I turned it on, it did look beautiful, but as I made the frame out of metal fly wire, when I touched it, it gave me a shock, so then I went to the solar version.

How to make a light of flowers from recycled PET plastic bottles

 

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Light cover made from recycled PET plastic bottles

Once again, I decided I had better stop talking, and start doing.  We have collected so many bottles at our place as we investigate options for recycling the 44 million PET bottles that are sold in Fiji each year. On the weekend, we made a cover for the outdoor fluorescent light out of recycled PET plastic bottles.

I had seen something similar on the internet, and decided to give it a try, as often these crafty ideas are not as easy as they appear, but this one was!

Here is what we did:

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Fixture attached to ceiling

My friend Vuli came for a visit with two of her grandkids.  It was her and I, plus 4 little boys as “helpers”, plus I had two boys with me.  I was going to take photos of the process, but we got caught up trying to mind 4 boys with a soldering iron and stanley knives, so you get the picture.

I can make an instructional set of pictures if anyone is interested.  The whole thing took about 2 hours in between making snacks for the kids and being a gopher for my husband while he and his father were doing some yard work, and Vuli and I secretly believe that we would have done it faster, and with a bit more of a polished result had we been “alone”.  It was so fun though and the kids had a ball, plus do they really want long lectures on recycling, or just a taste of the action?

Materials:

1 piece of chicken wire or other mesh as big as you need to hang below your fluorescent light (ours was about 25cm by 85cm)

  • 12 or 14 plastic PET bottles any size
  • scissors
  • stanley knifeIMGP7610
  • spray paint
  • old wire (we used an old piece of electrical wire and pulled it apart)
  • a couple of curtain rings if you are fancy
  • a couple of screw in eyelets if you want to permanently attach it
  • soldering iron or other hot poker type device to poke holes in the flowers to thread the wire through

Method

  1. wash the bottles
  2. cut the bottles in half around the middle.  We used the stanley knife just to make the first incision, and then used the scissors to cut around
  3. use the scissors and cut lots of little strips into the bottles to form the petals

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    With the light on

  4. you can use a butter knife and pull the strips similar to the way you use curling ribbon, but we found the simplest thing for the kids was just to bend the petals back and kind of fold them for some kinks
  5. you can put two pieces one inside the other if you want a fuller flower, or just use one
  6. put on newspaper or an old mat and use any colours of spray paint to lightly spray each flower (we had black, gold and red)
  7. use the soldering iron or a heated up skewer to poke a hole in the base of each flower
  8. thread a piece of wire through the hole (or fishing line might be good)
  9. attach the wire to the chicken wire frame
  10. use one longer piece of wire at each end to make it hang, and put curtain ring on each so that you can hang up
  11. use two screw islets to hang from ceiling, or we just threaded some wire through the verandah.
  12. anyway, it looks really nice, and even the men like it.  It gives the fluro light a softer glow somehow

 

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Daytime view with light off

I just can’t get this idea out of my head! Plush upholstered foot stool from PET plastic bottles

Capture footstool 1

Steps 1, 2, 3 and 4 it seems. Source: http://www.designrulz.com

Capture footstool 2

Finished stools – this could be steps 5 to 100, or just step 5, I will let you know

 

As I have been trawling through the internet looking for answers to what consumes me since I have been in Fiji

  • why is there so much plastic dumped in Fiji and the Pacific,
  • who is responsible – corporations or consumers,
  • what happens to the PET plastic bottles,
  • what happens to the liquid waste from drink bottling companies such as drinks giant Coca Cola Amatil in Fiji, also owner of Fiji Bitter, Bounty Rum and more,
  • where do they get their water from in Fiji etc, etc, etc

I came across this idea and instruction photo series (even though only 4 pics, the instructions seem short – therefore right up my alley!) for an upholstered foot stool with the internals being just a few plastic bottles sticky taped together.  It looks so easy!  I posted a link to it and 44 other ideas to recycle plastic PET bottles days ago, but then this one idea just keeps tapping me saying (make me! try me!) I then trawled the internet again to see if there are any other ideas for furniture similar, as we need a couch!

Furniture in Fiji is very expensive, and I would assume that the same is true of other developing nations.  It could be because traditionally, and still now, the majority of iTaukei (indigenous) Fijians sit on the floor to eat, and also sleep on the floor.

Anyway, I digress.  I could find no other examples of this type of furniture.  I have been thinking how light it must be, and what a great use of PET bottles.  In case you are new to my blog, we have literally millions of them here in Fiji in the form of pollution in the ocean, and on land.  I won’t labour that point here, feel free to browse through the posts, pages and pics.

I also today, due to our lack of furniture, had occasion to sit on my verandah on a 30 litre yellow plastic cooking oil drum.  We also have a million of them here in Fiji!  I was thinking that I could first make the foot stool from the bottles, and then after that, venture into a sofa from the drums. 

As I couldn’t find any other similar posts, I copied the pics and inserted here as it was in a longer article I posted last week, and may have been missed by other furniture-less unfortunates such as myself!

I am going to make the foot stool on the weekend, and will post a picture of my effort, and any tips.  I am sure it is not as easy as it looks to herd all the plastic bottles successfully into a sticky tape, (cello tape if you prefer), cardboard sandwiched perfect circle! The earlier mentioned article was at http://www.designrulz.com/product-design/2012/11/45-ideas-of-how-to-recycle-plastic-bottles/

15 Ideas on how to recycle plastic bottles

I came across this today: http://www.designsclue.com/15-best-ideas-of-how-to-recycle-plastic-bottles/

Wow!  Maybe it will solve some of our problems.  I have been wondering how to get recycling bins in public places in Fiji and worried about the cost.  No need to worry further – just find someone who can help me with putting them together!

Also, check out the garden fence, hydroponics, and house!